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Marguerite Moreau

Marguerite Moreau

Marguerite stars as "Monica Young" on ABC's drama series "Life As We Know It". She earned her big break at the age of 15 when she was cast in Disney’s feature film franchise, The Mighty Ducks. In 1993 she received a Young Artist Nomination for her performance. She went on to graduate from Vassar College with a degree in political science, while building a resume that spotlights a talented and varied range on the acting canvas. Currently Moreau stars in Jane Weinstock’s feature film, Easy, which premiered at the 2003 Toronto Film Festival and was later featured at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival. Her additional screen credits include Free Willy 2: The Adventure Home, Wag the Dog, Mighty Joe Young, Wet Hot American Summer, Queen of the Damned and Runaway Jury. Moreau most recently garnered critical acclaim for her portrayal of Susan “Sadie” Atkins in the telefilm Helter Skelter. Among her other television credits are starring roles in Firestarter 2: Rekindled and Hallmark Hall of Fame’s The Locket. Currently Moreau resides in Southern California and enjoys reading, dancing and the outdoors. Marguerite was born on April 25, 1977, in Riverside, California.

 

Marguerite Moreau Talks About "Off the Lip"

Marguerite Moreau began her acting career in the “Mighty Duck” movies, and followed that up by playing the dream girl in “Wet Hot American Summer.” Moreau then went on to play Stuart Townsend’s love interest in “Queen of the Damned” and Gene Hackman’s assistant in "Runaway Jury.” In her newest feature film, the surf movie "Off the Lip, Moreau stars as a rookie reporter having a tough time tracking an elusive big wave surfer who doesn't want to be interviewed.

The casting call for “Off the Lip” stirred up a lot of interest amongst young actors who were intrigued by this low-budget surf movie. Casting director Cathy Henderson, who coincidentally is a surfer, knew they’d found the star when Moreau turned up to audition. “When Marguerite Moreau read I knew immediately that I had found Kat. She had both dead pan comic timing and great dramatic ability. And she had this incredibly effervescent quality about her,” recalls Henderson.

INTERVIEW WITH MARGUERITE MOREAU (‘Kat’):

You did this movie several years ago. Is it strange to come back and do publicity for it now?
Not so much. We’ve all been talking about it over the years. We’ve all remained really close friends. It’s been waiting for the genre to kind of catch up. It felt like it’s a little ahead of the curve, like with “Riding Giants,” “Step Into Liquid,” “Blue Crush” you know, these all have been picking up on the whole surfing interest – all the television shows and stuff like that. We were just waiting until like, “When is everyone going to get it?” It’s a nice little romp of a film with great surf footage. We were just kind of waiting.

Did you enjoy surfing? Had you surfed before?
I’m from Newport so yeah, totally. I think that’s one of the reasons the director and I clicked. He goes out way more than I go out. [He] surfs Zuma all the time so we had a good talk about it. We had a good debate going the whole movie about longboard versus shortboard.

What was the debate?
I was for longboard, he was for shortboard. He’s more about cutting it up.

Do you still surf a lot?
I’m more of like a recreational surfer but not like a consist surfer. Some people get out every week or every day.

It’s such a good workout.
If you like that feeling of the water turning you upside down and spitting you out viciously (laughing).

How much time did you spend in Hawaii?
I think two months. It was bliss. I ran away with my girlfriend, we were in Poughkeepsie, New York going to Vassar and it was freezing. We were like, “What are we doing?” My parents are like, “We’re staying at the Ritz Carlton and we have a free suite.” My girlfriend’s said, “I’m turning 21. Let’s go.” We just split. We didn’t tell anyone for two weeks we were in Maui and I was like, “I’m not going back.” My parents were said, “As your graduation present, we are going to pay for your last semester at college.” I was like, “I have to go back.” The minute I graduated they [said], “How would you like to do this movie in Maui where you’ve just been and almost moved?” It was kind of like Kat’s dream job was too good to be true, and that was completely my experience as well. Everyone’s been asking me, “Do you identify with your character?” “Yes!”

So finishing college helped?
The long term is yet to see. But I did choose a field called acting so my parents are much more traditional in their view of a life passion, as it were.

But you’ve been in a few major movies now.
They’re very happy with it. They’re like, “We’re a little more comfortable with this idea. She’s actually doing well.”

What was it like shooting “Off the Lip?”
It was cool. It was like shooting on tape so you could shoot as much as you wanted. You were with a really light crew. You shot pretty much in order so it kind of gave you a lot of room to evolve your character, and kind of change it every day. I didn’t know what my character was going to do. We’d all get into [working] on the character and at the end of the day it would be like, “It doesn’t really work. Okay, let’s try it this way.” And we had a script that was really solid and we knew how we were going to shoot and how the energy of it was going to go. So it gave us a lot of freedom to use the camera as a character. It’s unlike a lot of formats in that you could be really experimental and see what would happen. We didn’t even know if we would have a film and what I think came together was like a really unexpectedly nice ride.

We started out with the idea of going dogme and then as we got there we realized we needed to have a little bit more structure for the kind of budget that we had, and the time that we had, and the capability of the locations. So we started out as far to the left as we could and then we found every single day of making a movie is going to bring new problems, so we just kind of adapted to make our thing.
It sounds like you shot "Off the Lip" almost like a play. Did it end up turning into something much different from the original script?
I don’t remember. I keep every script from every film that I ever made because it’s like a workbook of that time in my life. It’s like in two bags, this script is so big. And I was looking at it before I came here, and I was like, “Can you throw some of this away?” I couldn’t even make heads or tails.

You’ve got “Helter Skelter” in the works. Are you done filming that?
Oh yeah, it’s coming out May 18th for Sweeps Week. I play Sadie Atkins. That was pretty messed up but what’s great about this film is that it totally focuses on his influence on The Family and not on the trial and the prosecution and stuff. It was wonderfully creepy but a freeing experience where you could totally justify everything you did – [be] as crazy as you want to be. The man who prosecuted them is an executive producer, Vincent Bugliosi, who wrote the book and so I could call him any time day or night and be like, “Ah, I’m going to play the scene tomorrow where you are interviewing me. So, what happened?” And we would just chat for hours just about how they felt like they were already free. They felt like they were untouchable. It was just this surreal kind of acceptance of life, and any choice they made was okay. So they had this freedom that you and I don’t have. Just to be that and to get to give yourself that ultimate permission was great.

As a society, what benefit do we get from retelling these true crime stories?
Because it’s an opportunity to understand how that comes to be, what part of society perpetuates a need for a child to have a teacher or a leader. Why do you need to go find love and find someone to give you answers? Parents are your teachers until a certain point, and if they don’t give you love, you’ll go somewhere else to find it. And so I think that’s what attracted me to it because I had the same question. What’s the purpose of this? My interest in why did she do this needed to be answered that I felt it was a great opportunity. I think that a lot of people against capital punishment have that same argument. “Well, if we get to know them and we understand, we can be more compassionate and provide an environment where it will be less likely to happen.” And it is entertainment and it is something that has attracted a bizarre sort of cult following because of his revolutionary ideas and his embrace of a liberal dogme. But I think if you listen to him for longer than a few minutes, he starts to go off into a tangent in which very few people can relate to.

The story follows the whole family. It kind of retells the story of what happened. But instead of the first Manson story, which I believe was in the ‘70s – the first television movie - it started at the trial and it was more about how the prosecution figured it out. It didn’t so much go into The Family and the motivations of the characters – and all the information is there, there’s documentaries, there’s tapes, there’s all of Vincent’s work. Pretty much all the characters who are in jail have written a book about it so you’ve got their perspective of it, however skewed they want you to see it or however truthful they are in their repentance. In terms of a piece of social history, I find it totally compelling how it changed the fabric of the mentality of America. You don’t pick up hitchhikers anymore. You did before that and now you don’t. They hitchhiked home from the murders.

What do you believe was Sadie Atkins’ motivation for the murders?
I think she was loved and cared for very much, and she wanted to impress Charlie. She wanted to be loved by him and she wanted to be his favorite, which at a time she was. I really think that anything she did for him garnered her what she needed, which was attention. It’s so simple. And she was turned out of her house. It was like, “We’ll disown you as a form of tough love.” I’m kind of weary of that now. I don’t think it’s so effective.

Marguerite Moreau stars in the "Queen of the Damned"

So tell me about your character in “Queen of the Damned.”
Oh man, she's messed up. She's more at home with the dead than the living. She spends all of her time chasing vampires and begging to be part of that world. She's an intellectual; she's not just a groupie. She studies their activities.

What interested you in this part?
Are you kidding? This is the role of a lifetime! This is the one studio movie where the girl isn't like “the girl” - you know what I mean? And I love vampire movies. I absolutely love them. I think they are sexy.

Had you read the book prior to filming?
Not prior, but I picked that sucker up right away. Excuse the pun (laughing).

What was it like working opposite Stuart Townsend?
He's brilliant. He's going to create so many memorable roles. He challenged me in every way, every single day.

What's next for you?
We shall see. I've got “Firestarter” coming out. It's a miniseries on the SciFi channel where I burn things up all the time. This is a sequel (to the Drew Barrymore film). They've written two more chapters about what happened.

Marguerite Moreau Talks About "Off the Lip"
Marguerite Moreau began her acting career in the “Mighty Duck” movies, and followed that up by playing the dream girl in “Wet Hot American Summer.” Moreau then went on to play Stuart Townsend’s love interest in “Queen of the Damned” and Gene Hackman’s assistant in "Runaway Jury.” In her newest feature film, the surf movie "Off the Lip, Moreau stars as a rookie reporter having a tough time tracking an elusive big wave surfer who doesn't want to be interviewed.
The casting call for “Off the Lip” stirred up a lot of interest amongst young actors who were intrigued by this low-budget surf movie. Casting director Cathy Henderson, who coincidentally is a surfer, knew they’d found the star when Moreau turned up to audition.

“When Marguerite Moreau read I knew immediately that I had found Kat. She had both dead pan comic timing and great dramatic ability. And she had this incredibly effervescent quality about her,” recalls Henderson.


Marguerite Moreau plays in the ''Off the lip?"

You did this movie several years ago. Is it strange to come back and do publicity for it now?
Not so much. We’ve all been talking about it over the years. We’ve all remained really close friends. It’s been waiting for the genre to kind of catch up. It felt like it’s a little ahead of the curve, like with “Riding Giants,” “Step Into Liquid,” “Blue Crush” you know, these all have been picking up on the whole surfing interest – all the television shows and stuff like that. We were just waiting until like, “When is everyone going to get it?” It’s a nice little romp of a film with great surf footage. We were just kind of waiting.

Did you enjoy surfing? Had you surfed before?
I’m from Newport so yeah, totally. I think that’s one of the reasons the director and I clicked. He goes out way more than I go out. [He] surfs Zuma all the time so we had a good talk about it. We had a good debate going the whole movie about longboard versus shortboard.

What was the debate?
I was for longboard, he was for shortboard. He’s more about cutting it up.

Do you still surf a lot?
I’m more of like a recreational surfer but not like a consist surfer. Some people get out every week or every day.

It’s such a good workout.
If you like that feeling of the water turning you upside down and spitting you out viciously (laughing).

How much time did you spend in Hawaii?
I think two months. It was bliss. I ran away with my girlfriend, we were in Poughkeepsie, New York going to Vassar and it was freezing. We were like, “What are we doing?” My parents are like, “We’re staying at the Ritz Carlton and we have a free suite.” My girlfriend’s said, “I’m turning 21. Let’s go.” We just split. We didn’t tell anyone for two weeks we were in Maui and I was like, “I’m not going back.” My parents were said, “As your graduation present, we are going to pay for your last semester at college.” I was like, “I have to go back.” The minute I graduated they [said], “How would you like to do this movie in Maui where you’ve just been and almost moved?” It was kind of like Kat’s dream job was too good to be true, and that was completely my experience as well. Everyone’s been asking me, “Do you identify with your character?” “Yes!”

So finishing college helped?
The long term is yet to see. But I did choose a field called acting so my parents are much more traditional in their view of a life passion, as it were.

But you’ve been in a few major movies now.
They’re very happy with it. They’re like, “We’re a little more comfortable with this idea. She’s actually doing well.”

What was it like shooting “Off the Lip?”
It was cool. It was like shooting on tape so you could shoot as much as you wanted. You were with a really light crew. You shot pretty much in order so it kind of gave you a lot of room to evolve your character, and kind of change it every day. I didn’t know what my character was going to do. We’d all get into [working] on the character and at the end of the day it would be like, “It doesn’t really work. Okay, let’s try it this way.” And we had a script that was really solid and we knew how we were going to shoot and how the energy of it was going to go. So it gave us a lot of freedom to use the camera as a character. It’s unlike a lot of formats in that you could be really experimental and see what would happen. We didn’t even know if we would have a film and what I think came together was like a really unexpectedly nice ride.

We started out with the idea of going dogme and then as we got there we realized we needed to have a little bit more structure for the kind of budget that we had, and the time that we had, and the capability of the locations. So we started out as far to the left as we could and then we found every single day of making a movie is going to bring new problems, so we just kind of adapted to make our thing.

It sounds like you shot "Off the Lip" almost like a play. Did it end up turning into something much different from the original script?
I don’t remember. I keep every script from every film that I ever made because it’s like a workbook of that time in my life. It’s like in two bags, this script is so big. And I was looking at it before I came here, and I was like, “Can you throw some of this away?” I couldn’t even make heads or tails.
You’ve got “Helter Skelter” in the works. Are you done filming that?
Oh yeah, it’s coming out May 18th for Sweeps Week. I play Sadie Atkins. That was pretty messed up but what’s great about this film is that it totally focuses on his influence on The Family and not on the trial and the prosecution and stuff.

It was wonderfully creepy but a freeing experience where you could totally justify everything you did – [be] as crazy as you want to be. The man who prosecuted them is an executive producer, Vincent Bugliosi, who wrote the book and so I could call him any time day or night and be like, “Ah, I’m going to play the scene tomorrow where you are interviewing me. So, what happened?” And we would just chat for hours just about how they felt like they were already free. They felt like they were untouchable. It was just this surreal kind of acceptance of life, and any choice they made was okay. So they had this freedom that you and I don’t have. Just to be that and to get to give yourself that ultimate permission was great.
As a society, what benefit do we get from retelling these true crime stories?
Because it’s an opportunity to understand how that comes to be, what part of society perpetuates a need for a child to have a teacher or a leader. Why do you need to go find love and find someone to give you answers? Parents are your teachers until a certain point, and if they don’t give you love, you’ll go somewhere else to find it. And so I think that’s what attracted me to it because I had the same question. What’s the purpose of this? My interest in why did she do this needed to be answered that I felt it was a great opportunity. I think that a lot of people against capital punishment have that same argument. “Well, if we get to know them and we understand, we can be more compassionate and provide an environment where it will be less likely to happen.” And it is entertainment and it is something that has attracted a bizarre sort of cult following because of his revolutionary ideas and his embrace of a liberal dogme. But I think if you listen to him for longer than a few minutes, he starts to go off into a tangent in which very few people can relate to.

The story follows the whole family. It kind of retells the story of what happened. But instead of the first Manson story, which I believe was in the ‘70s – the first television movie - it started at the trial and it was more about how the prosecution figured it out. It didn’t so much go into The Family and the motivations of the characters – and all the information is there, there’s documentaries, there’s tapes, there’s all of Vincent’s work. Pretty much all the characters who are in jail have written a book about it so you’ve got their perspective of it, however skewed they want you to see it or however truthful they are in their repentance. In terms of a piece of social history, I find it totally compelling how it changed the fabric of the mentality of America. You don’t pick up hitchhikers anymore. You did before that and now you don’t. They hitchhiked home from the murders.

What do you believe was Sadie Atkins’ motivation for the murders?
I think she was loved and cared for very much, and she wanted to impress Charlie. She wanted to be loved by him and she wanted to be his favorite, which at a time she was. I really think that anything she did for him garnered her what she needed, which was attention. It’s so simple. And she was turned out of her house. It was like, “We’ll disown you as a form of tough love.” I’m kind of weary of that now. I don’t think it’s so effective.

Marguerite Moreau plays in the SCI-FI Miniseries '' Firestarter: Rekindled''

Fresh off her co-lead role in the gorgeously rendered film of Anne Rice's Queen of the Damned, the stunning Marguerite Moreau ascends to feature stardom in the SCI FI PICTURES ORIGINAL miniseries Firestarter: Rekindled. A sequel to the novel Firestarter by Stephen King, this science-gone-psychotic thriller follows the all-grown-up Charlene "Charlie" McGee (played in the 1984 film by Drew Barrymore) as she tries to come to grips with her pyrokinetic "firestarting" powers — and again faces the sociopathic government agent, Rainbird, who murdered her parents and tried to control her.

Born April 25, 1977, Moreau, who graduated from prestigious Vassar College with a degree in political science, has been an actress since childhood. She became a family-friendly favorite playing Connie Moreau in Disney's three Mighty Ducks films. After the first of them, Moreau went on to play the recurring role of Melanie in the hit TV series Blossom. She has also guested on Boy Meets World, The Secret World of Alex Mack and The Wonder Years (her screen debut, at age 11). Moreau later starred as Patty Duke's daughter in the short-lived drama series Amazing Grace, and has since appeared on 3rd Rock from the Sun and Second Noah.

Moreau's feature films include Free Willy 2, Wag The Dog, Mighty Joe Young, Wet Hot American Summer and the made-for-TV movie My Husband's Secret Life with Anne Archer. Her upcoming projects include the surfing mockumentary Off the Lip, and the German film Rave Macbeth, a modern-day retelling of the Shakespeare tragedy.

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: Marguerite Moreau on "Off the Lip"
The beautiful and talented Marguerite Moreau has an extensive list of different types of projects to her name. From big budget Hollywood films like “Runaway Jury” and “Queen of the Damned,” to television roles in “Smallville” and “Boy Meets World,” to acclaimed indie films such as “Easy” and “Wet Hot American Summer,” she has proven that she is one of the most versatile actresses out there.

Moreau stars in the indie comedy “Off the Lip,” opening in select theatres nationwide today. She plays Kat, a young girl who takes on a reporting assignment for an online surfing website. Her mission: to locate the elusive, all-time great surfer, known only to people as “The Monk.” Despite sounding too good to be true, Kat takes off to Hawaii to begin filming reports for her website. She is joined by her fiancé Brad who decides to document the experience as well. Her search leads her through exotic locations while meeting the strangest people.

I got a chance to talk to Marguerite on the phone recently and below is what she had to say about the movie.

TC: Thank you for doing the interview!

MM: Thank you for the interest. I hear you have a great website

TC: So why did you decide to do “Off the Lip”?

MM: It was my first job out of college and it seemed too good to be true to go make a movie really creatively, and go to Hawaii and actually have someone pay me for sitting on the beach, [hearing] lots of comedians making me laugh all day, and getting pampered. It sounded like a great gig and it was.

TC: And you did this right after graduating from Vassar?

MM: Yeah, I had the summer to have that classic six months of “Oh my God, my life is completely different and I don’t have to go to school anymore.” I was then like, I should go get a job and so then we went to Hawaii, which really distorted my perception of work.

TC: How was it filming in Hawaii? Was it like one long vacation?

MM: Yeah but at the same time, you weren’t just getting up and sitting by the pool. On some days, you were up at 5 o’clock in the morning before the sun rose and then you’d ride in a caravan, because we didn’t have big movie trucks and things like that, or trailers, or any of that normal stuff that is the hardware of a movie camp. The sun would come up, over the ocean, and we’d be eating scrambled eggs before we shot some stuff. It was a vacation in the sense that it was the best working conditions. I don’t think it rained while we were there, the entire time, which was incredibly beneficial for us. It was incredibly unusual for Hawaii so we felt sort of blessed. We did have some wipeouts and we did earn some scars but for the most part, I think they were really happy to have us there and we really respected the place. We got to make a really whacky, funny movie at the same time.

TC: Given the nature of filming and also the story, was there a lot of room for improv?

MM: Oh yeah. We had this great script but they were really encouraging. Everyday, the story would evolve depending on what we found the day before, so I would not know if I were going to find the monk or not. Or maybe Kat would go sleep with this guy, or maybe she was going to go salsa or hula with another guy. I didn’t know from day to day because whatever we found the next day, we would just take it to another level. There was a lot of evolution that happened because we also got to shoot it in order pretty much.

TC: Did you pick up on any surfing when you were there?

MM: I surfed before because I’m from Newport Beach, California. So I was put on a surfboard by a cute boyfriend in high school. I went to Hawaii myself with my girlfriend while I was in my senior year and surfed when I was there and almost didn’t come home and finish my year out but thank God I did because I got to go back.

TC: What is it about the surfing and the culture that makes it so special and unique?

MM: I think there’s something about it that’s very calming. It gives you a very solid feeling once you’ve swam out into the ocean and you gain a perspective of yourself. You step into another element. The surfing culture reflects that and I think there’s an easy going nature that comes with a perspective of things that aren’t as important as we make them sometimes. That’s something that my parents gave me always, being on the beach. “Hey, take it easy, put your flip-flops on. Put some sand in your toes. Go surf that wave.”

TC: As a person who has been in various independent movies, do you think it’s hard nowadays for independent films to be seen by a wide audience?

MM: Yes. I’m going to a film festival right now for a different film that got accolades at Sundance and has played for packed houses of all ages. The big companies are like, “It’s so good but we don’t know how to market it.” Everywhere we go, it’s been so positive but I think it’s more difficult. All the theaters are owned by smaller groups of people and Miramax can buy a small independent movie that isn’t very good but because it has great relationships with different theaters, it can get into a big theater off of who’s in it and not how good it is. So that’s difficult but that’s business too. I’m doing my work in an environment that’s ultimately about dollars and cents.

You definitely want to do the little films and they’re always going to be harder but you don’t do them to make money. You do them so you can see what you can make with the research that you have. I’ve definitely been in movies where they’ve had so much money and of course, because there so much money as an investment monetarily, they’re going to get it out there just to recoup. But they didn’t get to go to Hawaii and do what we did and be on horses in the rainforest with a crew of 10 people. It’s intimate and special.

TC: You were in another smaller, independent comedy called “Wet Hot American Summer” which is personally, one of my favorite comedies...

MM: Right on!

TC: Does it shock you that while it wasn’t a widespread massive hit, it became a cult classic on DVD with college students and the underground?

MM: I’m just so excited that they get it and like it. When we were making it, we were like “Whoa. Oh…this is good!” We were hoping it wasn’t just us.

TC: Another thing I think is cool is the fact that you were one of the Mighty Ducks! What was the one thing you took from the whole experience because you did do three movies with them…

MM: Mighty Ducks? I’m glad that I grew up. It’s very painful to go through adolescence, right? Like in high school, you don’t want to go back and do it over again. But I had two high school groups. I had the Mighty Ducks, who we all went through puberty together and learned the whole how you interact with your teammates type thing. It was a very interesting time. I think we all saw each other when we were the most vulnerable and insecure. We bonded in a way you only can in those situations. Also, I got to play hockey.

TC: I’ve always wanted to ask you this: I was watching one of the Mighty Ducks movies recently and I noticed that your last name is the same last name as your character, because you use “Moreau” on your jersey. Did they just not bother to come up with a last name for your character?

MM: Well, when we did the first one, we didn’t know we were going to be doing a second one a and a third one. When it came time to pick our numbers and our name, if we didn’t have a last name, we could pick whatever we wanted so I picked Moreau so my grandpa could find me on the ice. And now, all of a sudden, we’re doing a second one and third one. But it’s great so I have my own name on my jerseys and stuff when I go to the games.

TC: What are you working on next?

MM: I’m waiting to hear on a pilot for the “Freaks & Geeks” guys. Did you ever see that show?

TC: I just bought the DVDs and I’ve seen about 10 of the 18 episodes. It’s a great show…

MM: Brilliant, isn’t it? You know one of the guys in it is in “Off the Lip”?

TC: Oh yeah, Dave Allen…

MM: When I saw him in “Freaks and Geeks,” he became cult status in my mind. When I made the movie, I had no idea he was in it. So they have a new show…

TC: What’s it about?

MM: It’s about sex. It’s from the perspective from teenage boys and I’m their very young passionate English teacher.

TC: So you’re the hot teacher?

MM: Yep.

TC: You mentioned earlier that you do the independent films in order to see what you can accomplish as an actor, but do you also like doing the bigger studio ones?

MM: Oh yeah, I got to work with Gene Hackman for six weeks, side by side, 12 hours a day. I think I’m most interested in working and learning from different people and telling good stories. It’s hard to find good stories because there’s so many people that have to make decisions and there’s so many decisions to be made and so many things to take into account. It’s hard to make something collaboratively. That’s the challenge and sometimes you’re successful, sometimes you’re not. I like working in any medium. Who’s making it? How much do I like the story? Does it contribute something?

TC: If you could have one superhero power, what would you choose and why?

MM: To be able to keep my mouth shut because it gets me in trouble. (Laughs) I think that would be the best. My mother would appreciate it.

Hot Marguerite Moreau is ready to go

“I'm the Alpha-female on set, I'm always ready to go and ready to charge into things,” says Marguerite Moreau, the energetic fireball, who stars in the mini-series Firestarter: Rekindled. Dressed in tight running shorts and a sports bra, the 24-year-old actress talks about a career that is suddenly as hot as her pyrokinetic character. Fresh off of Queen of the Damned, which debuted at the top of the box office charts, she blazes on the small screen with an all-star cast that includes Dennis Hopper, Malcolm McDowell, and Danny Nucci.

Firestarter: Rekindled is a sequel to Stephen King’s 1984 film, Firestarter, with Moreau taking over the role originally played by Drew Barrymore. As Charlene “Charlie" McGee, Moreau plays the product of a government drug experiment, who was born with the ability to set thing ablaze at will. It is a physically demanding role that challenges Moreau to find an emotional core to an alienated and disaffected character.

“I try to reach into Charlie and subtly bring out something sympathetic about her. She's not evil. There is definitely a lot of sexiness wrapped up in Charlie. It all has to do with sexuality and feeling comfortable."

The inexhaustible young actress immediately hit it off with her Firestarter: Rekindled co-stars and looked to them for insight on travails young actors have in moving on to more adult roles.

"Dennis Hopper and I immediately synched up; there was a connection that was there from the start.

She also found a kindred spirit in Malcolm McDowell, who as evil government agent John Rainbird, uses a group of children with strange psychic powers to pursue Charlie.

“I've got a lot of energy and Malcolm's got a lot of energy, so we just energized each other. I've really learned an unbelievable amount from both Malcolm and Dennis. They've been in this business a long time. They both started in it as young actors, so it's a great road map. They are both very giving actors."

Like Hopper and McDowell, Moreau also started in the business at a young age.

"I started acting at age 13. I was on The Wonder Years, where I got to flirt with Fred Savage. It was nerve-wracking, because here I was flirting with a boy that I secretly had a crush on."

Her TV career continued with recurring roles on Blossom and Boy Meets World, and she was a regular on Amazing Grace. She is best known as "Connie" from the popular Mighty Ducks films. Last year, she co-starred in Rave Macbeth, a retelling of the Shakespeare play set in the underground culture of the rave scene, and she was in the sleeper hit Wet Hot American Summer.In 1999, Moreau graduated from Vasser College, after majoring in political science, and her Hollywood career returns her to familiar territory.

“I was raised all over southern California. My father is a hospital administrator and my mother is a registered nurse."

Sitting on a hill in front of an abandoned VA hospital, which is being used as a Firestarter: Rekindled set, she talks about the pyrotechnic f/x in the tele-film.

"It's got all this great fire and running stuff. This isn't blue screen, this is the real thing and those flames are intense! You would run too if you were near something that hot."

While her on-screen character, Charlie McGee, may have trouble expressing herself, off-screen she has a playful relationship with co-star Danny Nucci. Nucci plays Vincent Sforza, a nerdy accountant that becomes Rainbird's unwitting accomplice.

”I love teasing Danny, he's just such a lovable guy, and he's a mad basketball fan! He's so into watching the Philadelphia 76ers and he's got me watching them, too."

While her Firestarter: Rekindled character may be far from her own personality, Moreau definitely has insight into the popularity of Charlie McGee.

“I think Charlie's fire starting is a metaphor for the frustration that a lot of young people feel in connecting with the world. She's alienated, hunted, and her anger gets channeled into her fire starting ability. While it's fantasy, it's not an unimaginable leap from how a lot of kids feel."



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