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jessica biel

Jessica Biel's Self Written Biography..

I was born on March 3rd, 1982, in Ely, Minnesota - the temperature outside was 37 degrees below zero! At the time, my Dad was the Program Director for the Minnesota Outward Bound School, which is an outdoor, adventure-based program. We lived 17 miles out of town near the Boundary Waters Canoe Area in a little cabin on the Kawishiwi River. I come from a very outdoorsy, adventurous, and extremely active family! I have lived in 6 states, but I like to call Boulder, Colorado home because that is where I spent the most time in one place. My closest, and best friend, Jesse Peterson, is from Boulder, and we have the greatest and wackiest memories from all our years together. She was actually on the cover of Jump magazine with me in 1998. The question I get asked the most is, "How did I get started in acting?" As a young girl, I took dance lessons, gymnastics, and voice lessons. I was also influenced by a lot of musical family members, so getting in involved in local musical productions was a pretty natural progression for me.

My first Annie audition. Sandy and me. When the movie Annie first came out, I became one of the obsessed 8 year olds who dreamed of being Annie. My first attempt was for the The Fairfield Playhouse in Fairfield, CT and the call-backs were at the Jeoffrey Ballet in New York City. I had no clue what league of talent I was competing against, I just knew I wanted to sing, "Tomorrow". I did get selected to be a "back-up" for Annie, which was a great compliment, but never put me on stage as Annie because the lead never missed a show! Eventually, when we moved back to Colorado, I did get the part of "Annie" in a local production. I lost my voice at the dress rehearsal for the opening night, but still was able to perform! Another night, Sandy, the dog took off after a cat that was backstage, so the audience had to wait as I called and called and called him. Finally, he returned. Pretty funny! "Hollywood" was not even part of my thinking or vocabulary during this time. I was content to perform for any local musicals and performing arts camps, but basically was a pretty normal, 9 year old kid who went to school and loved gymnastics, roller-blading, mountain-biking, dancing, and playing soccer.

It wasn't until I signed with a Denver talent agency that Los Angeles became part of my reality. On the encouragement of my Denver agency, I went to the IMTA (International Modeling & Talent Association) convention in LA in January of 1994. (Check out their website at: www.IMTA.com) I was 11 years old and was competing against hundreds of kids, but the cool part for me, was that I did really well in all my categories and won an acting scholarship to the Young Actor's Space in Los Angeles - one of the best acting schools for young actors run by Diane Hardin and Nora Eckstein, two of Hollywood's finest ladies. For the next 3 years (from January to March), I took schoolwork from my Boulder, CO teachers, and headed to LA with my family to concentrate on acting classes and auditions, but school always came first, as LA has important laws to protect child actors. Auditions could only take place after 3:00 each day, so I still spent most of my day in school. I auditioned for every TV show, film, or commercial that came my way. I landed the role of Mary Camden on 7th Heaven after 3 years of spending 2-3 months per year auditioning and training in LA. In the same week that I became Mary Camden I was offered my first role in a feature film, Ulee's Gold, which filmed in Florida first. As soon as we finished shooting, I flew to LA to shoot the pilot for 7th Heaven. What an amazing year! Ulee's rebellious grand-daughter, Erin. All of this excitement and success was the culmination of years of training and commitment and from being surrounded by great supportive people. There were no complaints coming from me.... I was shooting scenes with Barry Watson! (Matt Camden) I totally had the hots for him!! So did Beverley Mitchell. We used to fight over who would get him. That crush faded only after we shot several episodes of 7th Heaven and Barry became just our older, annoying, protective, television brother, who in real life, was interested in girls a lot older than Bev and me! The entire TV cast of 7th Heaven became my second family – they are amazing people and my time on that show has been a "once in a lifetime experience".

My high school years were spent on the set of 7th Heaven. Being tutored on the set of a television show definitely had its pros and cons - like having plenty of time to study for an test before it was given, or having the coolest set teacher for all 4 years (that's my teacher, Cheryl Diamond, in the picture with me). The downside was having no other classmates and sometimes barely getting a grasp on a geometry theory before being pulled out of school to go shoot a scene! Of course, during these years, Beverley Mitchell (Lucy) became my best friend and real life older sister. (Bev is 1 year older than me.) We will be close for the rest of our lives. Bev and I have shared some of life's greatest joys and sadness. We have been through a lot together (like growing up) and it hasn't always been easy, but we know and appreciate how blessed our lives have been. Jennifer and me (freshman year at Tufts University) Ever since I was a little girl, I dreamed of going to college, so in the fall of 2000 I became a freshman at Tufts University. I lived in a small dorm room with my roommate, Jennifer. Our narrow room, on the bottom floor of the building, had a view of the garbage cans outside! After spending a year at Tufts, I returned to 7th Heaven to finish out the 6th season of the show, then returned to Tufts for another fall semester. Someday I hope to go back to school and complete my college degree. I made some great friends in college - here we are after a Tommy production that I appeared in at Tufts University.

Since leaving Tufts, I have focused my professional efforts on my movie career. In the summer of 2003, I filmed The Texas Chainsaw Massacre in 100 degree weather outside of Austin, Texas. Yep, that's real sweat running down our cheeks! Great cast, great crew, and very intense emotional scenes. During one scene, I did do a total face-plant while running through the woods that never made it into the movie, but it might be in the DVD "behind the scenes". Recently, I finished a small role in the New Line film, Cellular, due out in the spring/summer of 2004. (Check it out on my News and Film page and look at some pictures in Backstage.) ....and by February, 2004, I will complete 4 months of filming my role in Blade: Trinity with Wesley Snipes and Ryan Reynolds. I play Abigail Whister and Kris Kristofferson plays my father. My character is skilled in martial arts and is a master marksman with a crossbow. This action role has required me to train extensively for the past several months not only to look the part but also so I could do as many of my own stunts a possible. Action in Blade:Trinity Even before finishing "Blade: Trinity", I have begun research for my next project - Stealth (see my News section for a synopsis of the film and an article of my recent visit to a Naval air station). I will keep you updated on the progress of the film.

 

Sexy Jessica Biel: From Chainsaw to Blade


Jessica Biel, who rose to fame in the family-friendly TV show Seventh Heaven, is all grown up, a wiser and more mature presence these days. As the heroine and sole survivor of the very gory remake of Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Biel admits to being a fan of classic horror. "I love films like The Shining, Carrie and The Changeling," especially with their lack of extraneous blood and violence. Sitting in a New York hotel room, the 22-year old beauty admits to not having yet seen her latest movie, the remake of the classic 70s thriller The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, which is why she insists that "there's a lot of brutality and violence, but --- not so much gore." She is surprised when told that very young children were seen at the pre-junket screening of the film, and yet genuinely feels that while making it, violence was never a concern. "It never occurred to me that we were making such a violent movie or that it is going to make young people want to be more violent. It might sound weird, but I just never thought about that. I don't think it's violent, but it could have been a lot worse", she says. Yet in preparing for the physically challenging film, which includes sequences with meat hooks and chainsaws, Biel's approach was unique. "What I did everyday was just substitute my brother into all these people. I don't mean I want to put him on the meat hook," she hastily adds. "It's him and the situation that would probably make me the most fearful that he would be gone from me from this earth and that was really helpful to make the scenes very real for me. I needed to believe that I was running away from a madman and it's my job in this life to save my brother because I'm his only hope. So I used him because I love him so much and he makes me cry," Biel says.

It was important then for the actress not to create a clichéd, screaming damsel in distress, knowing full well that she can be a role model for young women. "I mean, this character is not a wench, nor a pushover, but she's smart, strong and assertive." Nor doers she believe she comes across as overly sexy as one suggests. "I haven't seen the movie, but I took every precaution on the planet to make it not about being sexy. I didn't go through this movie going, okay, ‘I run like this' Then I'm sexy and strong. I never ever once thought: How is this going to make me sexy? To me it was how I am going to make this real and how am I going to make this scary? How am I going to make women watch this movie and not go, oh God, another girl running around in her little bra, panties and thong tripping and running through the door?"

Yet, despite her often defensive protestations, Biel is beautiful and sexy, denying that being labelled a sex symbol somehow enhances her appeal at the box office. "I don't really know if it enhances it or not. I mean, I don't know if it does. It is not in my plan or my life to be a sex symbol," says the insistent actress. "You are who you are and you can't help what you look like, so I would prefer to downplay it the sex appeal because there's so much stuff all over the place and I really wanted this movie to be scary and real and not about protruded breast shots." Inevitably the conversation switches gear - literally, to her infamous semi-nude photo shoot that appeared in soft-porn Gear Magazine three years ago. Then a rising teenage star thanks to the family-oriented Seventh Heaven, the photo shoot seemed to be a deliberate ploy on Biel's part to change her image so as not to be typecast as the good girl next door. Not true, says a defiant Biel who, three years later, remains clearly bitter over that experience. "I want to say that because I was 17 years old, it was my first adult photo shoot. It was supposed to be sexy and fun and not at all naked." Biel says "It was just supposed to be underwear, but I got in a situation where I was encouraged and I was not looked after by the people I was working with." Biel adds that getting older would have enabled her to make the segue into more adult roles, not a naked photo shoot. "I think that change of image was going to happen naturally. You get older, you look and act differently, your ideas are different and every year you change so much, so when that photo shoot came out it was really horrible for me." Yet, the older but wiser Biel has no regrets, "because I've learned about being able to stand up for myself and say: You know what, no, I'm not going to wear that? I was working with a lot of men, who were my managers which wasn't a good thing for me. I really needed to be surrounded by a woman or women who would just say, that's really not the smartest idea." Biel says that degree of exploitation is not uncommon in Hollywood. "I think this happens to so many girls and it's not a bad sob story. I'm not looking for people to go, oh. I mean this was one of the hardest times I went through my whole entire life. I really embarrassed my family, I embarrassed myself. Thank God for 7th Heaven, the fans and Aaron Spelling who was so forgiving. But the reality is, when your 17 years old, you think you know everything, you want to be 25," Biel says laughingly. "You want to wear the sexy clothes and someone says, yeah, that looks great, why don't you just lift that up?"

Biel says that today, no more sleazy magazine photo shoots. "I'll only do a photo shoot for a magazine that I think is reputable." In the meantime, the beautiful actress has to try and set herself apart from all of the other beautiful young women trying to make a name for themselves in Hollywood, about which Biel remains philosophical. Sometimes, you just feel like you're one of many, but I guess I feel different because I had such an awesome childhood, I have such awesome parents, such a great family that if it were to end tomorrow, I would never change in their eyes. I would never change and they wouldn't care." Biel hopes to return to college to complete her studies, because "it's really, really important for me personally. I want that degree, to go to classes and feel, after a semester's done, that I could find myself talking to my parents about all this stuff I didn't know anything about and I'm just rattling it off, feeling very confident and smart so I can talk to anybody about so many different subjects." But she still has time to kick plenty of butts, on screen at least. Biel is wrapping up the final in the Blade franchise. "I play Abigail Whistler, Kris Kristofferson's daughter and basically, I've been training in secret with a team of vampire hunters, including Ryan Reynolds, because Blade is in a situation where he needs help, so my team basically bails him out and says: Surprise." From a chainsaw to a blade, there may be a pattern to the born again, but reluctantly sexy, Biel.

Jessica Biel plays a party girl in ''The Rules of Attraction''

Fans who know Jessica Biel from her role as Mary Camden on "7th Heaven" may not know that she began her career as a vocalist performing in musical theatre. Biel starred in stage productions including "Annie" and "Beauty and the Beast" before turning to modeling and commercial work.

In "The Rules of Attraction," Jessica Biel plays Lara, party girl and roommate to Lauren (Shannyn Sossamon) the virgin.

Was the script a turn-off or did it make you immediately want to be in it?
Actually, they sent me the script a while ago, way before I even started filming. They said, "Look at the role of Lauren." And so I read 30 pages and I was like, "I don't get it. I don't get this. I think it's kind of..." I didn't really like it at first actually. I was reading it for Lauren and I was concerned about the scene with the sex and the throw up. I'm like, "I don't know. I don't know." We didn't do anything about it and then a couple months later they said, "Well, Shannyn's gonna play this and James is gonna play this, but how about... Are you interested in Laura?" I read it again for Laura, and I was into it. I think maybe I really liked being a smaller part in a larger ensemble piece.

How did you feel about changing your image?
I don't really care about, you know, changing my image. I just wanna do different things. That kind of was the draw for me - when I thought about being an actor as a little kid - is that I can be a princess, I can be an archeologist, I can play this person, I could be anything. It doesn't have to be me and that's the great thing about the job. It wasn't so much I wanna change my image, it was just that it's different. This is not me as a person and I'd like to try to create a nasty, horrible character who's insecure and has all this stuff going on because it's not me. And it was scary. It was challenging to do that.

How difficult has it been to get past the wholesome image from TV?
I don't know. I don't really think it's been that difficult. I know that might sound weird, but the roles that I've been doing...for example, "Summer Catch," I played an older girl. I played somebody who's gotten out of college. She was smart, she was mature, and I think that was really the same as Mary's character because Mary's a really independent, cool, smart girl, but this girl was a lot older. I haven't been held back by [directors] thinking, "Oh, she's so innocent and so whatever." I don't feel like that's been the case. It's a hard question because sometimes I feel that it has been hard. There have been some roles that I've been really interested in. There was this one role where she was supposed to be almost beatnik, dark, and an almost homeless kind of thing. They wouldn't even see me just because of the way I physically look and how I looked on the television show. So, that's a little difficult. I look back at it now and it doesn't really seem like it's been that hard.

Did anything crazy happen between takes?
It was all crazy. Maybe not crazy, but just fun. It was really fun. Just like laughing and goofing around, making jokes, having fun.

Who lightened the mood?
Who lightened the mood? Joel [Michaely]. Joel lightens the mood. He's just a goofball. He is a big goofball. Who else? Kip [Pardue]. Kip was really fun.

What's James Van Der Beek like?
He's great. We actually got along really well. We had a lot in common and [he's] just a nice person. He's one of those guys who's always really calm, really collected, and really wonderful to work with. [He was] really supportive, especially in our sex scene because I had never done one of those before and he just made me feel comfortable. He was really nice.

Does a feature film set feel different from your work on the TV series?
It's the same in that we sit and we wait. The logistical stuff about it is pretty much the same. It's different because I know the crew on "7th Heaven." I know the cast; I know everybody there. I've known them for seven years and I know them very well, so it's comfortable. It's really comfortable when you're all old friends and it's like we get right back into the swing of things every time I see them. On a movie set, it's like a really intense experience for a really short amount of time. Well, not really. It's just it's really intense for a couple months and then that's it - you're done. You have to get there and you form good relationships right away because - I don't know why. You're just there and you kind of have to be comfortable when you want to be friends with everybody. It's definitely more nerve-racking. The first day on a new movie, for me personally, is nerve racking.

Which do you enjoy more?
That's a good question. I don't know. I mean, I enjoy doing television because of "7th Heaven," because I know everybody so well. When we have a really emotional scene or an intense scene, it's so comfortable that it's so easy to get there. It's so easy to be in a vulnerable spot. Everyone's so supportive and fair. "Do you need a few minutes? Do you need to stop?" Or whatever, you can keep going. They just know my pattern, you know what I mean? They know how I do things. But it's also really, really fun because I get to meet different people and I get to work with so many cool people and be on location, which is really fun when you're doing a movie. It's also a challenge to not be in the supportive, comfortable place. Be in that, "God, I hope, you know, I'm okay." Get there and you feel good. You feel proud of yourself like, "All right, you know. I can be in a kind of new situation, a new place and still be okay, and still be good, and still make friends."

Have you gone to college?
I went for my freshman year two years ago, took a year off, and then I'm actually going now.

How does this movie capture the college experience?
I think on a realistic level, it hasn't captured my college experience. I go to Tufts University, which is a pretty small private school where it's difficult to get in. Not to say that parties aren't going on, but it's not crazy. It's not anything like what we depict.

Is it hard to be in school with your career?
It's pretty good actually. People treat me pretty normally. I think most of all, people just won't talk to me. That's the kind of thing that happens. I wouldn't necessarily say that they're ignoring me on purpose, just I think it's kind of like they don't really know what to say and I sometimes don't know what to say either. So I'll just sit there. If I'm in a class where I don't know anybody I sometimes just won't talk to that many people. But people treat me really cool and they don't bug me. They're great. They're really great.

What have you learned about yourself from doing this film?
I think that I've learned that I can create a new person. I can create a character, which is [something I] really haven't had to do before. I felt that I've been able to be me a lot in the last couple things that I've done, in everything that I've done. This character's really different, so I've learned that I can create something from nothing and have it work. I learned that. I guess that's it. I don't know. I'd probably have to think a little bit more.

What do you think is the film's message?
There's a part in the movie where Shannyn says, "You're never gonna know me." I think that's kind of an interesting message. Do you ever really know anybody? I thought that was interesting. I also think that maybe it doesn't have so much of a message as it's just representing what it's like to be a kid and be at school, not have a clue what you wanna do and have your life kind of planned. Like, you think this is how you want it to go and it just doesn't go that way. It's like everything's against you at the moment. I think it's just kind of representative of what I think sometimes a lot of people go through in college. Bad stuff happens, good stuff happens, and sometimes it just really sucks, but that's kind of what you have to go through. I don't know. I guess the characters kind of go through almost a cathartic like... the crap hits the fan and then you're all right. It's not a really happy thing at the end of this movie. It's just kind of realistic about what's going on. So, I don't know exactly about a message.

Jessica Biel is Daddy's Little Vampire Slayer

"Blade" fans know from the first film that Blade's father figure, Whistler (Kris Kristofferson), got into the vampire-hunting business because his entire family was wiped out by vamps. Or were they? According to the third installment, "Blade: Trinity," one member lived — and it ain't Whistler's mother. Instead, Whistler's daughter, Abigail, was born out of wedlock after the massacre and grew up to lead a sleeper cell of "Nightstalkers" — vampire slayers who come to the aid of Blade (Wesley Snipes). Being daddy's girl, Jessica Biel of course has all the best toys — from secret blades in her boots to an ultraviolet laser-beam arc that can cut a vamp in half to silver-tipped arrows that pack a nasty UV punch. We recently caught up with Biel and came away with this bit of advice: Don't startle her in the dark.

MTV: So did you feel a little like "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" training for this film?

Jessica Biel: Yes I did, I did definitely felt a little Buffy-esque. Um, I don't know what kind of training she went through, but my training was pretty intense and pretty hardcore. It was great, but it was a long process.
MTV: How much training was involved, and what part was the hardest?

Biel: I think the hardest part was the archery, because I have a bit of a dance background, so martial arts came a little bit easier to me and I've taken Tae Bo classes before, so I kind of have an idea how to punch. Archery was something I had never tried, never had a chance to participate in, so that was the most challenging activity that I learned.

MTV: Along with the different types of fighting, you had a lot of different types of weapons.

Biel: My bow was pretty cool. I had never seen one in a shape like that. It's a compound bow, so it has a different shape and it's really high-tech and cool, so that was cool, and I think I liked it a lot because I knew it, I understood it, I knew how to work it. My other weapons, one was half [computer generated], so I had the handle of the weapon but the rest of my UV arc wasn't there, so that wasn't anything exciting. But I had a really cool pistol, it was a seven-shooter, kind of like country — you know, a little bit Old West style, and it would shoot seven bullets instead of six, so that was really cool.

MTV: Your character seems so fearless, but is there anything that you yourself are actually scared of?
MTV: How much training was involved, and what part was the hardest?

Biel: I think the hardest part was the archery, because I have a bit of a dance background, so martial arts came a little bit easier to me and I've taken Tae Bo classes before, so I kind of have an idea how to punch. Archery was something I had never tried, never had a chance to participate in, so that was the most challenging activity that I learned.

MTV: Along with the different types of fighting, you had a lot of different types of weapons.

Biel: My bow was pretty cool. I had never seen one in a shape like that. It's a compound bow, so it has a different shape and it's really high-tech and cool, so that was cool, and I think I liked it a lot because I knew it, I understood it, I knew how to work it. My other weapons, one was half [computer generated], so I had the handle of the weapon but the rest of my UV arc wasn't there, so that wasn't anything exciting. But I had a really cool pistol, it was a seven-shooter, kind of like country — you know, a little bit Old West style, and it would shoot seven bullets instead of six, so that was really cool.

MTV: Your character seems so fearless, but is there anything that you yourself are actually scared of?
Biel: I'm scared of weird things. Bugs, spiders don't bother me. Insects? Not a big deal. But I'm scared of being home by myself at night. I know, that's weird. I think I have a bit of a fear of the dark, which is strange. I really think I've seen way too many horror films. I loved them as a kid, but now I just think someone is after me all the time, which is so ridiculous.

MTV: But now you have so much training in fighting, couldn't you fend them off?

Biel: I'm ready, bring it. I can totally fend them off, or at least I can do my routine on them and confuse them for a moment and then I can run, so that's the idea, jump out the window and run. ... I have a nice base [of skills] at least, an idea of lots of different types of martial arts and some boxing and kickboxing, so if I needed to defend myself, I think I would feel kind of remotely confident about it, and if I had to do another movie that involved any sort of martial arts I think I would be, you know, a step ahead than maybe somebody else 'cause I've had this experience of all of this training, so it's really valuable and I'm so glad that I got it.

Jessica Biel is a fashion-conscious vampire hunter with bow and iPod


Even Buffy took her job more seriously than Blade does.
The first two installments of the “Blade” trilogy had funny moments. But they were essentially serious action films. “Blade: Trinity,” on the other hand, is a straight-up
This time around, Wesley Snipes’ vampire saga is told with an overt sense of satire, almost as if it’s critiquing the seriousness of the superhero genre.

Blade, a half-vampire, half-human warrior, beat the hell out of the Vampire Nation in the first two films. So this time, the vampires have called for reinforcements. They go to Iraq, of all places, to find their most powerful champion — Dracula. There he lies, buried in a cave. Yes, an Iraqi cave.

The vampire lord is the newest weapon of mass destruction to terrorize the Western world and the vampires’ only hope to kill Blade.

Jessica Biel (from the WB’s “Seventh Heaven”) and Ryan Reynolds (“Van Wilder”) team up with Blade, creating one of the more absurd trios in pop culture.

Abigail (Biel), a fashion-conscious vampire hunter, stalks her prey with a bow and arrow while decked out in spaghetti-strapped tank tops and her trusty iPod. Hannibal King (Reynolds) is a former vampire and an arrogant jokester who always has something sarcastic to say.

Blade, in contrast, is the emotionless, anti-social superhero whose facial expressions never seem to change. At one point, King asks Blade if he ever blinks. “Blade: Trinity” has the advantage of being written and directed by David S. Goyer, the writer of the first two films. With this advantage, “Trinity” is able to be just what Goyer had in mind from the start.

This time, there’s no question the film is supposed to be funny. What other superhero vampire slayer is going to fight through hordes of bad guys just to get his trusty sword back? Not many. And certainly not Buffy. But Blade will. And that’s funny.

Jessica Biel shows off her archery skills In ''Blade: Trinity''

Watching "Blade: Trinity" is like being rolled down a marble staircase in an oil drum. The movie is loud, dark, bumpy and not even a little fun. You emerge into daylight bruised and battered, suffering a case of movie abuse. You don't need a film critic; you need a social worker.

In "Blade: Trinity," Snipes talks hardly at all, and when he does it's with the grumpy bitterness of an old guy who thinks he is entitled to more. In this case, he is.

Instead, he gets less. Like oh so many older guys, he's surrounded by smartmouth kids who know it all and hunger to replace him. They all think they're funnier than he is and better looking than he is and that the movie should be about them, not him. What they don't get is that what sells a movie isn't just youth and charm, quite common in this world, but charisma -- the power to dominate a scene without moving or talking. That's something Snipes has and nobody else in this film does.

When he lets go, in full "Blade" splendor, a fusion of action, fury and righteousness, he's the best thing in the film. But mostly Snipes is in the background as Jessica Biel and Ryan Reynolds take the forefront, on director David Goyer's theory that youth must be served. (I agree, though I prefer my youth served over fettuccine with a Madeira cream sauce and a nice chilled pinot noir.)

The movie takes off from the shaky idea that Dracula has returned from a millennium or so under the Middle Eastern sands and, like everybody who has overslept, he wants breakfast! Drac -- called "Drake" here for some reason, and played by the unprepossessing Dominic Purcell -- when annoyed turns from human to demonic form, 6 feet 8 inches of "Predator" imitation. His mouth looks like something they used to pick up radioactive waste at Chernobyl. Soon enough he's laid up with a colony of high-tech vamps led by Parker Posey at her most downtown languid, and they begin to cruise and drain the night away.

Meanwhile Blade, framed by the vamps for killing an actual person rather than a vamp and pursued by the FBI (a plot strand the movie ultimately forgets all about), takes up with a new set of vampire hunters, kids all. The prime funbunchers are wiseguy Reynolds and dish Biel. Somehow Reynolds's character, Hannibal King, has been designated The Amuser by Goyer, so much of the screen time is spent on his ironic quips. He's one of those guys who always have a comeback.

Goyer plays this for laughs but Snipes isn't laughing, and somehow you feel his discomfort with his premature retirement; the movie needed more of him and less of the kids. As for Biel, mainly she models really ripped abs and shows off her archery skills.

But once the action starts, everything else stops. It's just one battle royal after another, most of it generic, all of it forgettable. Bring aspirin and don't say you haven't been warned.

Art of being Jessica Biel

If it weren't for acting, I would: "Just go and be a doctor or something. I have to be doing something. I love to be busy."
Reel life: "I'm a lot like Mary, actually. We both play basketball, we're both tomboys, we both don't like to dress up. Also, we both kind of get into the same trouble with guys."

Sign language: "I'm such a Pisces, a total fish who loves to spend the entire day in the water."

Daredevil: "I'm the kind of person who has to try new things, and even though I might fail, I'm going to practice and keep going until I get better."

Party of one: "I can't imagine myself with one person for the rest of my life. If I ever get married, I'll be, like, 45. I just have so much to do."

The fame game: "Fame is kind of weird sometimes, but I'm used to it. Sometimes I freak myself out that I'm so used to it. But it's like, I don't know, peeing! It's natural."

School Rules:"I'm so happy that I'm taking the time to go to college. I live in a dorm and am surrounded by kids my own age all the time. If I'm lonely or need support, I've got my friends around."
Theme Queen:"I probably go to three or four theme parties a year. If you're having one, I'm really going to go all out for it. For a Luau party I wore a bra made out of shells and a grass skirt (with something underneath it of course)."

Sisterly Advice:"When it comes to dating advice, my little brother thinks he is so mature. He's a junior and he's already dating seniors so I don't even bother. I will however, get into it with him when he and my parents knock heads. He's at that age where it seems like conflicts happen all the time. That's when I will try to sit him down and give him a few pointers."

Jessica Biel on the red carpet in Australia


The stunning star of Blade Trinity, Jessica Biel, has been confirmed to attend the Melbourne red carpet premiere of the movie on December 16.

Biel will be joined by director David S. Goyer and co-star Ryan Reynolds at the Jam Factory in Chapel St. Too bad Blade himself, Wesley Snipes, couldn't make it as well.

Jessica Biel Kicks Butt In Blade

Jessica Biel, who plays the vampire-hunting Abigail in the upcoming Blade: Trinity, told SCI FI Wire that she did many of her own fight scenes, including a climactic one involving several attackers. "The fight scene ... took, I think, ... two days to shoot, because we shot it in one long master, basically," she said. "And it was 13 guys, and it was one after another after another after another. ... It worked much better for me to keep doing it in one big whole ... sequence than to chop it up, because ... you lose your momentum coming from one person to the next."

To prepare, Biel (formerly of The WB's 7th Heaven) trained heavily with stunt people. "I was also working with the best stunt people ever," she said. "I mean, they sold everything. ... If I gave kind of a crappy punch, they still sold it like I knocked them out. So it was really half our stunt people's fault that it looked so great. ... It was 14, 15 hours one day of just fighting all day long, and after the day, I was just wiped, every muscle. So I almost threw out my back. I mean, you get to a point where you're like, 'Holy crap, I don't know if I'm going to survive it.' But it was awesome. It was so much fun."

In Blade: Trinity, the third installment in the Marvel Comics-inspired franchise, Biel plays the daughter of Kris Kristofferson's Whistler character and a member of a young team of vampire hunters called the Nightstalkers, who work alongside Blade (Wesley Snipes). Biel appears lean and muscular in the film. "I was in the gym six days a week, a couple of hours a day," she said. "And then [an] hour of fight training, an hour of archery, and a super-strict diet through the whole movie. ... Heavy weight lifting. For bulk. To bulk up in the beginning, and then once I got to a certain size, it was more of a maintaining [thing], and lots of cardio to lean as much as you can down. That's why I had, like, those striations, like, ripped down my muscles, because we worked to build and then maintain and then leaned it out as much as we could." Blade: Trinity opens Dec. 8.

Jessica Biel has come a long way, baby, from her days as a preacher's kid on Seventh Heaven. Now that she's fighting vampires in the upcoming Blade: Trinity, Biel is letting her inner tough-girl out to play. "It was so much fun. I loved it," says the actress of the action in the movie, which also stars Wesley Snipes and Ryan Reynolds. "What a dream to be able to kick boys' butts all day long.''


Blade: Trinity's Music to Slay By Launched



New Line Cinema and New Line Records have teamed up to launch "Music To Slay By," a unique online promotion tied to the Dec. 8 release of Blade: Trinity. Available online at BladeTrinity.com as well as MusicToSlayBy.com, "Music To Slay By" is a contest and content web site inspired by the final installment of the "Blade" trilogy, which stars Wesley Snipes, Ryan Reynolds and Jessica Biel. Contestants are invited to create their own "slaylist' of songs they would listen to while slaying vampires, just as Abigail Whistler (Biel's character) does before heading into action in the explosive film.

"My character listens to music throughout the film, creating 'Slaylists' to hunt by," said Blade: Trinity star Jessica Biel. "Lately, my personal music list runs from Bob Marley to Joss Stone. The Music To Slay By website allows fans to share their personal soundtracks with the 'Blade: Trinity' community." Site visitors can also browse other users' slaylists and rate them. Each week beginning Nov. 17 and extending through the film's release, the user with the highest rated slaylist will win an Apple iPod. In addition to the user-submitted slaylists, the site also features several celebrity slaylists from Blade: Trinity cast members Reynolds, Biel, Parker Posey and write and director David Goyer.

"Music in 'Blade: Trinity' was key to the characters and the pace of the film. Working with the RZA as the co-composer for this film was fantastic because I've long been a fan of his sound. He has an ear for the unusual and I wanted his imprint throughout the score, interweaving his sounds and beats with the more traditional orchestral music," said Goyer. "This promotion gives us the opportunity to share our musical tastes with fans through the active community boards on the 'Blade: Trinity' website. Jessica, Ryan and I have all enjoyed this one-on-one interaction with 'Blade' enthusiasts."

Jessica Biel co-stars in the SF movie ''Stealth''

Jessica Biel co-stars in the upcoming SF film Stealth, playing a Navy jet fighter pilot who must team with fellow pilots Jamie Foxx and Josh Lucas to bring down a robot airplane after an incident alters its artificial-intelligence programming. "The plane flies on its own," Biel said in an interview. "There's no pilot on the plane. It's got a brain of its own. It can take off and land on its own. But it's supposed to listen to orders."

Biel, who next appears in the upcoming sequel film Blade: Trinity, added, "So if our commanding officer gives a command to do some mission, it takes on that mission, and it completes it. And that's its job. It does what it's told. But when it goes AWOL, we have to try to stop it. The brain has gotten jumbled. Something goes wrong in the brain, and it starts to choose. It starts to have its own opinion. And it chooses to survive."

The actress went on to reveal that the plane determines that its highest chance of survivability is to fly solo. "So it decides to go off on its own, and it starts to download missions from the computer that aren't real missions, that are only practice missions," she said. "But if it carries out the missions against these countries, it'd be starting World War III or World War IV. We have to stop it before it injures people and kills civilians. And it plays out over a series of days." Directed by Rob Cohen (XXX), Stealth will be released next summer

Jessica Biel helps to raise money for RAINN

Can you judge a celebrity's cachet by the value of her corset? If so, older actresses in Hollywood are a hot property. In a runway auction Wednesday night at the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel, hosted by Frederick's of Hollywood to raise money for RAINN (The Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network), the big bucks went for corsets designed by celebrities 40 and older.

The evening's hostess, Susan Sarandon, 58, teamed with her buddy, Geena Davis, 48, to design a corset inspired by their 1991 film, Thelma & Louise. It went for $5,000. Barbra Streisand's corset — roses painted on black leather — fetched $3,000 (she's 62), while CSI's Gary Dourdan was among the bidders on a black leather corset accessorized with dangling purple and white beads. Designed by Diana Ross, 60, it sold for $2,600.

By comparison, 19-year-old Scarlett Johansson's red-and-white checked number, which looked sort of like a sexy picnic basket, went for only $1,000. And $1,400 was all bidders were willing to shell out for a Catwoman-inspired leopard print corset, designed by Halle Berry, 38. Additional corsets designed by such stars as Edie Falco, Tori Amos, Britney Spears and new hubby Kevin Federline, and Courteney Cox and David Arquette were available for bidding too. We asked some stars to confess their embarrassing lingerie stories:

Eva Longoria (Desperate Housewives): "When I was on Young & the Restless, I had to do a scene with chocolate-covered strawberries. I ended up sitting in melted chocolate and had it all over my lingerie."

Susan Sarandon: "When I was a kid in Cannes for the first time, and I wasn't wearing underwear, all the (camera) flashes made my garments transparent. That was an interesting lesson."

Geena Davis: "When I auditioned for Tootsie, they said, 'You'll be in your underwear a lot in this part,' so I had to send over my portfolio which was filled with these perfectly lit modeling shots from Victoria's Secret. So they were like — 'let's get her.' "

Jessica Biel (7th Heaven): "When I was 11, I wore these teal granny panties. Our neighbor's dog ran into our house, got my underwear and swallowed it. The dog got surgery (to remove the underwear). My neighbors cleaned the underwear, folded it, and brought it back to me."

Tori Spelling: "I don't know, but I'm not wearing any right now, and I wish I'd put some on. It's a little breezy."

More About Blade: Trinity and Jessica

Do you have a cool outfit? I have a cool outfit. I do. But it’s not very Blade. I’m not in leather pants and a leather shirt and all this cool leather stuff. I’m more casual. I have all these different outfits but my outfit that I like the best is this cool like almost like workout pants. Like black workout stretch pants and I have a cool brown leather vest. And I’m wearing like a sports bra. And it was really cool. I’m really dressed for the part because there’s no way you could go out in a Wonderbra and do this.
What are the pressures of being an action heroine? It’s nerve-wracking. It’s always nerve-wracking for me I think. I always feel like I got myself into something that I don't know if I’ll be able to handle.

Are you working a lot with Wesley? I’ve actually only worked one day on Blade so far. I’ve just been there training for a month and a half. My first day was with Wes. I didn’t have any dialogue with him but he’s really cool. He’s interesting. He’s kind of more of a reserved person than I would have expected, but he’s really funny and he’s kind of coming out of his shell and he’s really nice. I’m getting along really well with him.

Can you watch yourself on film? I’m pretty critical. I’m analyzing a lot of the time. I need to see the completed version at least three or four times before I can just let it go and just watch it as a whole, watch the whole thing and stop just watching myself and going, “I hated that line” or something like that. I mean, I do that all the time. I’m pretty critical.

Are you signed on for a Texas sequel? No, I don't think there’s anything about sequels in our contract.

Would you do one? I don't think so. I have a problem with sequels, and now I’m doing a third, of course. I have a problem with doing a sequel for this movie. It’s just not needed. What would it be to do? It’s the same story again? To make more money? It would be done just for a commercial payoff or something. It wouldn’t be for like another acting piece. It’s like you can’t really keep this going. And the sequels that have been done from the original, I personally think really stink. They were not good at all. And it starts being silly. People are like, “Okay, okay.”

.Did you have any makeup at all in this movie? Not much. We started the day, of course we had foundation and stuff like that but I wore chapstick, I wore a tinted chapstick, and mascara and by lunch it just was all gone.

Was it real sweat or did they spray you? It was both.

How taxing was the shoot? I would just go home and pass out. I was just out. I didn’t dream, I didn’t have nightmares. It was so taxing. I just remember every day my eyes and my eyelids, I looked like I’d been in a boxing match. My lips were swollen, my eyelids were swollen, I just cried all day long. It was like being premenstrual for like a month at a time. It was very taxing.

What was the most physically difficult scene? I guess the obvious answer is the running, but you know what the most physical scene in Texas for me was dragging [Jonathan] Tucker around. Tucker, he was into it, which is so good and he literally just let himself be dragged. And he might look kind of not like he’s going to weigh a lot, but he’s heavy. And I dragged him many, many takes and after that, my muscles were burning. That was a really hard scene. That was really hard.

Did the physicality of this prepare you for Blade 3? Yeah, I guess it did. I mean, I did a lot of running in this movie. Blade, I’ve been training like a maniac. It’s so much more physically demanding then Texas Chainsaw Massacre was. This man I’m working with, Chuck Jeffreys, he’s this amazing martial artist and what’s cool about Blade is I’m not learning just one. He has experience in I think probably hundreds of techniques of different martial arts and boxing and street fighting. What’s cool about it is it’s not going to be anything like Crouching Tiger. No one’s like spinning through the air. This is back to old school fighting techniques. I’m just kicking people in the head all the time.

 



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