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Howard Stern; King of All Media!

The self-proclaimed King Of All Media, is undeniably one of the most popular figures of the media world. His immense popularity, as well as the controversial topics of his radio show, have certainly placed him at the top of the Either you Love Him or You Hate Him list. It seems like he represents the major part of the US demographic, which holds one of the lowest literacy rates of all industrial countries, as his syndicated radio show receives one of the highest set of ratings around the world. This shock jock is heard by millions of avid listeners all over North America during his morning radio show. He manages to raise hell on a daily basis in order to ensure that his fans keep listening. His many stabs at controversial subjects include offering John Bobbitt money if he would show his severed engines. his ongoing radio success has encouraged him to enter the publishing world with his first book Private Parts. This autobiography was the fastest-moving book in its publisher's history, as it sold over a million copies in the first two weeks of its release. Private Parts was the start-up idea for a movie version that was to be released four years later, and receive the highest test-screening rating in Paramount's history. It seems that Howard simply has a way of making it successfully in every media he ventures into. His enormous success pushed him to come out with his second book, Miss America, a few years later . Once again, his work created enormous success as his fans showed great loyalty in all that Stern does.

Howard Stern was raised in Long Island, New York. His strict-mannered and overwhelming mother made his childhood a unique one that resulted in the Howard that millions enjoy listening to today. He was the typical little kid that always got picked on, and that preferred staying indoors rather than playing outside. His father, who was a radio engineer, is one of the reasons that he got starting in the broadcasting business all together.

Howard worked several deejay positions in cities like Detroit, Hartford, and Washington, D.C., where he first started working with his co-host Robin Quivers. All these jobs came from his involvement with college radio at Boston University. His previous radio jobs were only the launching pad to what would become a more flamboyant career on the airwaves.

New York proved to be the more popular and profitable market for his crazy and weird comedy, to say the least. As much as controversy can cause ratings to skyrocket, there are issues that can arise. In 1992, the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) fined The Howard Stern Show's owner, Infinity Broadcasting, $600,000, after Stern discussed (among other things), masturbating to a picture of Aunt Jemima.

As Stern is a man of integrity and pride, he refused to be disgraced by the FCC, and invited them to kiss his a**. Stern was a 1994 candidate for New York governor as he campaigned for issues like bringing back the death penalty (Volt For Every Vote) and eliminating daytime traffic construction. A year later, New York Governor George Pataki signed a bill, dubbed the Howard Stern Bill, which restricts construction to night time on state roads on Long Island and in New York City.

It seems that Howard's on-air personality is very different than when off the air, as he is husband to Alison, and a loving father of three daughters. It was announced, however, that Stern separated from his wife in 1999 after more than 20 years of marriage. This news came shortly after he started another successful venture with The Howard Stern Radio Show on Fox.

 

FCC Head Michael Powell, Foe Of Howard Stern, To Step Down

'Thank God he's gone,' Stern says on air.

Michael K. Powell, whose accomplishments as head of the Federal Communications Commission included a crackdown on alleged broadcast indecency that targeted shock-jock Howard Stern, announced his resignation on Friday.

In a statement, Powell said he notified President Bush on Friday ( January 21) that he would be
stepping down as commissioner and chairman "some time in March."

Powell, the son of outgoing Secretary of State Colin Powell, became a divisive figure for his campaign against broadcast obscenity. Stern's show, with its often provocative content, was a frequent target of the FCC's ire.

The show was penalized most in 2004 (see "Howard Stern Broadcast Costs Clear Channel Nearly $500,000"), when the FCC collected more than $7.7 million in fines from broadcasters, up from $48,000 the year before Powell became chairman, according to The Associated Press. Powell was promoted from commissioner to chairman in 2001 when Bush took office.

Responding to rumors about Powell's resignation on Friday morning, Stern (who will move to uncensored satellite radio provider Sirius in 2006) expressed his excitement that the chairman would be leaving.

"Thank God he's gone," said Stern, whose Web site currently features a large photo of Powell with superimposed devil horns. "This is a great day in broadcasting."

Stern has said on-air several times that Powell was promoted because of his father. In October, he made a surprise call to Powell, who was doing a live interview with a San Francisco radio station, to accuse him of nepotism.

Powell retorted that Stern's allegation was "a cheap shot."

Powell's less controversial achievements include the implementation of a "Do not call" list to block phone solicitations, a move to allow cell-phone users to keep their number despite switching service providers, and an increase in Internet accessibility outside the home.

"Evidence of our success can be seen increasingly in the offices, the automobiles and the living rooms of the American consumer," Powell said in the statement announcing his resignation. "The seeds of our policies are taking firm root in the marketplace and are starting to blossom."

Though there has been no announcement of a replacement, The New York Times speculated on Friday that candidates could include the FCC's Kevin Martin, who is considered more conservative than Powell; and Becky A. Klein, a former Texas regulator who was appointed in the 1990s when George W. Bush was the state's governor.

Powell, who began his work with the FCC in 1998, was slated to leave his post in 2007.

 

Poor Howard Stern - Two More Words He Can't Say On Show: "Satellite Radio"


In recent days, two broadcast groups, Citadel and Beaseley, have yanked Howard Stern off of at least 5 stations between the two. Why? Well, Beasley is mum on why he’s off WQAM-AM, Miami.
But, Citadel took Stern off stations in Syracuse, New York; Providence, Rhode Island; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; and Grand Rapids, Michigan because the company felt Stern was using his syndicated show and their airtime as an "infomercial" for his impending jump to SIRIUS Satellite Radio.

And they have a right to be annoyed. If I was the CEO of Citadel, I’d be pissed, too. Do you think your current employer would let you promote your next job at their detriment for the benefit of your new employer?

That would be like a cashier at McDonalds telling customers he’s sick of the place, the food sucks, and by this time next week he’ll be at the Burger King across the street – so please drop by for a Whopper.

And what’s even funnier is Stern is now complaining about how the latest forbidden words on his program are "Satellite Radio".

So, let me get this straight: he’s upset that he’s under fire because he wants to use his current client’s airwaves to draw listeners away - from his current client’s airwaves.

Well, in Radio I can tell you this: when you get fired or quit, the first thing they do is jerk you off the air pronto because the last thing they want is for you to say anything negative about the situation or the company.

But, with Stern still riding out another year on his contract, he’s in the enviable circumstance of being able to not only earn a paycheck but aid in the promotion of his future home and employer, SIRIUS. This is a Stern affiliate’s WORST nightmare!

Not only do Terrestrial Radio stations not want to talk about Satellite Radio in general but the ones carrying Stern especially don’t want him to keep reminding their customers (listeners) that he can’t wait to leave and what a lousy place AM and FM is.

And that brings up my final thought. Would he have been as successful if there hadn’t been a Federal Communications Commission fining him all these years? The F.C.C. has been the yang to his ying and the complaints they've acted on have brought him priceless controversy, press, notoriety, fame, and fortune.
On Satellite Radio, there are no censors, no boundaries, and no legalities to interfere with raunchy or racy content which brings to mind an old saying that might be applied here:

If a tree falls in the forest and no one sees it, does it make any noise???

Allow me to rephrase that:

If a Stern talks on a satellite and only paid subscribers hear the noise, does anyone else care?

 

Howard Stern kicked off Miami station

The raunchy radio star has been pulled off the air in five markets, according to recent reports.
It looks as though you can add a Miami radio station to the growing list of broadcasters that are taking Howard Stern off the air.

Just days after news leaked that Citadel Broadcasting Corp. had pulled Stern off the air in four markets, the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported Tuesday that the raunchy radio star has been yanked off of Miami's WQAM, an AM station owned by Beasley Broadcast Group.

Assuming no other radio stations have cancelled "The Howard Stern Show," 41 stations now air the shock jock's four-hour morning show.

Citadel Broadcasting, a Las Vegas-based operator of 200 radio stations around the country, has bumped Stern off the air in Syracuse, N.Y., Providence, R.I., Harrisburg, Pa., and Grand Rapids, Mich., according to reports. Citadel officials weren't available for comment.

Farid Suleman, the chairman of Citadel (Research), is reportedly upset over Stern's frequent on-air promotions of Sirius Satellite Radio, the paid radio service that announced in October a $500 million, five-year deal to air "The Howard Stern Show" beginning in January 2006.

Stern plans to leave the public airwaves and Infinity Broadcasting, the Viacom (Research) subsidiary, when his contract expires this December. Stern has cited the recent government crackdown on public broadcasts of profanity and indecent material as the primary reason for jumping to Sirius (Research).

Stern's constant touting of satellite radio -- and its freedom from decency laws -- has also angered his Infinity bosses and led to speculation that Stern would exit the public airwaves sooner than planned. But Stern and Infinity president Joel Hollander have publicly stated that Stern will stay on broadcast radio until the end of the year.

Beasley's reasons for pulling Stern off its Miami radio station were not immediately clear. The Federal Communications Commission in November proposed a $55,000 fine against Beasley, which owns about 40 radio stations, over a Stern broadcast.

A company spokeswoman did not have an immediate comment, but said it appeared that Stern's show was still airing on a second Beasley (Research) radio station in Fort Myers, Fla.

Stern has now been pulled off the air in the Miami-Fort Lauderdale market twice in the last year. Clear Channel Communications in February dropped Stern from its WBGG FM station in Miami soon after Janet Jackson's bare breast was broadcast on live television during the Super Bowl half time show. Clear Channel (Research), the country's largest radio operator, eventually dumped Stern from all six of its stations that aired his show.

Infinity, the country's No. 2 radio station owner, responded in July by expanding the radio show to 9 additional markets, including Palm Beach, Fla. That move brought to 45 the number of stations airing Stern.

A month later, Beasley announced it was picking up Stern's syndicated show in Miami. Following a two-week vacation, Stern's syndicated morning raunchfest was supposed to resume broadcasting Monday, but Citadel-owned stations didn't bring him back.

As opposed to previous Stern bootings, Citadel did not blame the jock's usual FCC fine-tempting lineup of sex talk, naked porn stars and fart jokes. Instead, the company said Stern was dropped because he has been plugging his new five-year $500 million contract with Sirius Satellite Radio, which begins in January 2006.

"Regrettably, Mr. Stern has transformed the content of his show into a continuous infomercial promoting Sirius, his new satellite radio employer," the company said in a statement.

Stern, whose current deal with Viacom-owned Infinity Broadcasting expires next December, has repeatedly touted his deal with Sirius as the antidote to constant scrutiny of the FCC, which has regularly fined him for indecency during his career.

Stern declined to comment on the matter. However, speaking to the faithful on Wednesday morning's program, he said he was bummed about the whole affair and blamed it on Farid Suleman, a former Infinity executive who now runs Citadel.

"Who are you punishing? You're not punishing me, I'm leaving in a year," Stern said during the broadcast, which remains on the air in 40 markets and has an audience of 20 million.

Perhaps hedging its bets, Citadel would not say whether Stern's banishment was permanent.

Per Syracuse's News 10 Now, outraged listeners there organized a protest outside Citadel's 95X headquarters Wednesday morning after the company replaced Howard with a heavily edited version of Opie & Anthony. (The duo was infamously exiled from the airwaves two years ago for broadcasting a couple having sex in Manhattan's St. Patrick's Cathedral.)

"It's the thing you're not supposed to do [to] your audience, you're supposed to treat them like, you know, they're God," Stern lamented.

Citadel is the latest broadcaster to ban Stern. Beaseley Broadcasting Group recently removed Stern from Miami's WQAM. While no reason was given, the company did come under fire recently from the FCC, which proposed a $55,000 fine against it for airing what it considered an obscene Stern spot in November.

In April, radio behemoth, Clear Channel yanked Stern off its airwaves after regulators threatened the company with massive fines stemming from what they deemed an indecent 2003 Stern broadcast. In June, Clear Channel eventually paid a record $1.75 million to settle complaints brought against Stern and other deejays.

After being dropped, Stern sued Clear Channel for $10 million, accusing the broadcaster of breach of contact; Clear Channel countersued Infinity for $3 million in July, alleging that Stern broke their contract by violating federal indecency regulations.

Two 'shockers' replace Stern in 95X reruns

WAQX-FM (95X) has traded one shock jock for two others.This week through Jan. 3, the Syracuse rock station is replacing reruns of Howard Stern's syndicated show from 6 to 10 a.m. weekdays with another controversial morning radio show, "Opie & Anthony."

It's the same "Opie & Anthony" heard since Oct. 4 on XM Satellite Radio, except it's airing a day late and is heavily edited, according to Tom Mitchell, operations manager at 95X.

There are times when they get into topics that aren't suitable for broadcast or they mention words we can't broadcast, so we have to cut them out," Mitchell said. "When segments run short, we fill it with music." He said this is the first time any radio station has received permission from XM to retransmit Opie and Anthony, whose real names are Gregg Hughes and Anthony Cumia.

Their appearance on 95X also marks the first time they have been heard on conventional over-the-air radio in nearly 21/2 years. In August 2002, the two were suspended by WNEW-FM in New York City for airing a show in which they encouraged a couple to have sex in St. Patrick's Cathedral.

At the time, the show was also syndicated to 17 other radio stations across the country, although it wasn't heard in Syracuse. Since 1996,when it first began airing Stern's show, 95X has usually aired "best of" reruns of his program when he's on vacation.

However, 95X owner Citadel Communications has been at odds with Stern recently because he has spent much of his morning show promoting his plans to move to Sirius Satellite Radio in January 2006. Stern complained this month that 95X has been editing out his discussions of Sirius and cutting off the show at 10 a.m., even when he has extended the program past that time.

Stern fan Rich Hatherill, 38, of Liverpool, has been disappointed with 95X's editing of Stern's show. But he said Wednesday he is pleased 95X is giving "Opie & Anthony" a try, although he wants the station to return to Stern when he's back from vacation. "They're not as good, no. On a scale of 1 to 10, Opie and Anthony are probably a 4, and Howard's a 10. But I think I probably would rather listen to them than the 'best of,' " Hatherill said.

Mitchell said 95X hasn't received much reaction from listeners to "Opie & Anthony," probably because of the busy holiday season.

He declined to discuss terms of the deal Citadel made with XM to carry "Opie & Anthony" or any plans for the show, although he said 95X expects to bring Stern back Jan. 3.

A representativefor XM couldn't be reached for comment. To hear the uncensored "Opie & Anthony," XM listeners have to pay $1.99 a month, in addition to the satellite service's basic monthly fee of $9.99. Programming on XM and Sirius is beamed to special receivers from orbiting satellites.

In recent Syracuse radio ratings, Stern's show was No. 1 overall from 6 to 10 a.m. weekdays, drawing about 12 percent of listeners tuned in to radio in that time period.

Howard Stern Told To Turn Down Sirius Hype

Howard Stern isn't allowed to appear in commercials or print ads for his 2006 gig with Sirius Satellite Radio until his contract with Infinity expires at year-end 2005. The Wall Street Journal reports that his current employer also "forced him" to tone down his frequent mentions of Sirius on his syndicated morning show—though in broadcasts last week, Stern was mocking the mandate by using fill-in sounds to refer to Sirius. He is on vacation untill Jan. 3, with his radio show currently running in best-of mode.

Jonathan Asher, a brand consultant with Dragon Rouge in New York, says in the WSJ article that the stay on Stern-Sirius advertising is likely a good thing: "If too much is said too early on, people could become disinterested before they're actually able to tune in to Stern's Sirius show."

Sirius added that a marketing blast is in the works upon Stern's debut, though it is already reaping the benefits of his announced move to the satellite network, with a 200,000 bump in subscriptions since the announcement. Sirius is also prominently hyping Stern's arrival on its Web site .

Howard Stern is mad

RADIO experts - and even fellow shock jocks - are amazed that Howard Stern is still allowed on the air after repeatedly trashing conventional radio and shamelessly hyping satellite radio, his employer-to-be in 2006.
Before rampant consolidation turned radio into massive station clusters that rely on a handful of superstars, DJs were never given the chance to announce their next gigs - much less stay on the air causing trouble until the new gigs kicked in. "This is madness," said Miami shock jock Neil Rogers. "How are they allowing this to continue going on?

"There's no question in my mind that he's going to do everything he can to get them to blow him out [early]," Rogers told listeners last week. Indeed, Stern even turned last week's David Letterman appearance - Stern and Letterman are both employed by Viacom units - into a humorless, non-stop infomercial for Sirius Satellite Radio.

Stern isn't scheduled to start on Sirius for a full 13 months but, because he's worth as much as $100 million to Viacom/ Infinity between now and then - in a rocky radio economy - execs have apparently decided to grimace and bear it. On the other hand, even though insiders agree there's no obvious heir apparent, many wonder how much longer Infinity can take Stern's daily abuse without doing something.

"Do you want a disgruntled employee on the air for another 13 months?" said Inside Radio editor Tom Taylor. "He abuses [FCC Chairman] Michael Powell, but maybe what we need here is his father, Colin Powell, to mediate the solution." Even Stern admits something has to be done.

"I don't know how people can listen anymore," he told Letterman. "The [heavily-bleeped] show is like Swiss cheese now," he complained, trumpeting the fact that satellite radio is censor-free. Before leaving for a week's vacation last Friday, he lobbed one more grenade at Infinity: "I can't wait to start [at Sirius]. Every time my show's edited, it takes a piece of my heart out." Infinity hasn't commented on Stern since his announcement last month.

 

Howard Stern promotes his new radio talk show which will be on satelite radio "Sirius"


Shock jock Howard Stern, surrounded by strippers and cheered by thousands of fans, began promoting his switch to satellite radio Thursday at a Manhattan rally where he handed out free boom boxes and satellite subscriptions.
"Down with the FCC!" Stern told a legion of sign-waving backers gathered at Union Square. "They have ruined commercial broadcasting." The fans agreed, screaming "Howard rules!" as their hero addressed the overflow crowd. Stern supporters spilled into the streets surrounding Union Square, stopping noontime traffic throughout the neighborhood.

"Most people think it, but don't say it," said Stern fan Peter Frankel, 50, president of a Long Island janitorial company, as he walked off with a free Sirius boom box. "Howard Stern says it. It's healthy for society." Across the square on Fifth Avenue, the culture war took on another slant, with fans of the rival satellite radio XM staging their own rally, hoisting placards touting the shock jock antics of its Opie & Anthony radio team. Stern will be able to say anything he wants once he starts at Sirius Satellite Radio, which is free of Federal Communications Commission restrictions. Stern has battled for years with the FCC over the content of his salacious show.

Last month, Stern announced he was leaving traditional radio for Sirius — even though his current syndicated show is scheduled to run through December 2005. Stern has hinted on his morning program that his January 2006 start date at Sirius could be pushed up. His current employer, Infinity Broadcasting, has ordered Stern to cut back on his on-air references to his move. Stern, who was scheduled to appear later on Late Show with David Letterman, left no doubt about his allegiance at the event.

"Once you start listening to (satellite), it's like crack," Stern said to cheers. "You will be addicted." Stern personally handed out a free Sirius boom box to the first 500 fans, while he had another 20,000 redeemable certificates for free radios. The equipment allows listeners, for $12.95 a month, to receive 120 channels of commercial-free music, sports, news, talk, entertainment and traffic. The certificates must be redeemed online by Nov. 24, and the redeemers must sign on for a year of Sirius — which would leave them just short of Stern's January 2006 debut. In October, Stern signed a five-year deal with the satellite company worth an estimated $500 million.

Howard Stern Confronts FCC Chairman Michael Powell Who Is The Son Of Colin Powell.

howard stern on the radio phone confroting powell

October 26, 2004.

Howard Stern squared off yesterday with his chief government tormentor, FCC Chairman Michael Powell, on a radio call-in show... That began with Stern ripping Powell's credentials and accusing the regulator of "racketeering." "How did you get your job?" Stern asked Powell, who was appearing on a talk show on KGO-AM, San Francisco. "Because it's apparent to most of us in broadcasting that your father got you your job. "I really don't even think you're qualified to be the head of commission," the shock jock said. Powell, who is the son of Secretary of State Colin Powell, appeared to hold up under the assault. "You can look at my resume if you want, Howard. I'm not ashamed of it and I think it justifies my existence," Powell said, ticking off his past experience ranging from clerk for a federal judge to chief of staff of the FCC's anti-trust division. "I think it's a cheap shot to say just because my father is famous I don't belong in my position." "It's not a cheap shot," Stern fired back. "For guys like me who came from nowhere out of nothing, who worked their way up . . . and have to answer to you . . . let's face it, you got to the head of the FCC, to the front of the class, the way George W. Bush got out of the draft." Stern, in New York, had called in to the show to confront Powell, who has been a favorite Stern target for years because of the heavy fines imposed on Stern and his employers, Infinity radio, for alleged indecency. The two sparred in a wide-ranging conversation that lasted for 15 sometimes surreal minutes. Station officials said that they had publicized Powell's appearance for several days and that Stern had called the station on his own. At one point, Stern accused Powell of "racketeering" because the FCC required radio stations to pay fines before they could appeal the violations in federal court.

Who wants Howard Stern out?

HOWARD Stern claiming he's being "jerked around" and "threatened" by his bosses says he might start on satellite radio a lot sooner than Jan. 1, 2006.
"A buddy of mine who shall remain nameless says . . . Viacom is trying to get Sirius [Satellite Radio] to pay off my contract and then I would leave early 'cause Sirius is anxious to get the show started," Stern told listeners yesterday. The top-rated bad boy who shocked the radio world last month with the announcement he was quitting broadcast radio to take a big-money offer from satellite radio has been sounding uncharacteristically depressed of late.

He says he's being peppered by "legal letters" and "threats" from Viacom lawyers.
And elsewhere around the country Stern airs in 46 cities his show is being heavily censored by Infinity, Viacom's radio unit. "Jimmy Kimmel wrote me [that] they're trashing the show [in L.A.], cutting pieces out and putting in more commercials than ever," Stern said. "I'm like, 'Dude, I'm so outta here, let 'em do whatever they want.'"

Stern even attacked the head of Infinity dubbing him "Joel 'dangerously close to losing his position' Hollander" and claimed Hollander is "busy meeting with lawyers [to] see if I violated my contract in some way. "Hey, I had a contract with you and I honored it," Stern said. "You want to pay off, let me know," he said. "You don't want to pay off, I'm here for the duration. "But you don't have to be d-heads about it." Stern is worth as much as $100 million to Infinity, but the company recently made it clear that it considers him only a small part of the Viacom media empire. Infinity and Sirius declined comment, although Sirius CEO Joe Clayton told analysts last month that a contract buyout "is indeed a possibility."


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