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Don Diamont

Don Diamont

Don Diamont joined the cast of CBS's "The Young And The Restless" in 1984 and played the role of Brad Carlton until 1995, returning in June, 1998. Diamont was the first actor from daytime to be chosen by People Magazine for their "50 Most Beautiful" Issue. In the Spring of 2000, Diamont was the recipient of the Australian Inside Soap Magazine Award in the category of "Most Missed Actor In Daytime." Diamont was acknowledged by fans, this time voting him sexiest actor on Y&R in the 2000 CBS Soaps In Depth Awards. A native New Yorker, Diamont grew up in Los Angeles and is the youngest of four children. Coming from a close-knit family, Diamont excelled academically in high school and was a star athlete. While attending college, he auditioned for renowned acting coach Nina Foch and was accepted into her scene class. Diamont's training led him to be signed by an agent and cast on the daytime drama series Days of Our Lives. His performance on the show led him to being voted "Best Newcomer" by the magazine Daytime TV. After his role ended in 1984, he was cast on Y&R.

Diamont had the starring role in the feature film Marco Polo opposite Oscar winner Jack Palance and the late Oliver Reed. He also had a supporting role in the feature film A Low Down Dirty Shame. He has guest starred in numerous primetime series and co-starred in the telefilm Country Justice opposite Oscar winner George C. Scott and Rachel Leigh Cook, and in the Family Channel telefilm Loyal Opposition with Corbin Bernsen. Diamont most recently appeared in the feature film Anger Management starring Jack Nicholson and Adam Sandler. Additionally, Diamont has been actively involved with Multiple Sclerosis, a cause that became close to his heart after his niece Alyssa was diagnosed with the illness. Diamont was the recipient of the 2001 Ambassador of the Year Award in recognition of his efforts on behalf of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Each year, he hosts "The Cure by the Shore" charity event to benefit The National Multple Sclerosis Society and The Diamont/Alyssa Mazur Fund for Multiple Sclerosis for the Department of Neurology at UCLA. When Diamont is not working, he enjoys spending time with his fiancée Cindy Ambuehl, who gave birth to the couple's twins Anton and Davis in January 2003, and with his other kids Lauren, Sasha, Alexander, Luca with his former wife Rachel Braun ( divorced in 2002). He is also an avid cyclist and enjoys playing basketball. He is 6'1," has black hair and hazel eyes. Don Diamont ( given name Donald Fienberg) was born on December 31, 1962 in New York, NY.

Don Diamont likes to play story that helps battle cancer

Ashley's Anguish: Eileen Davidson, Don Diamont, Jaime Lyn Bauer and Head Writer Kay Alden talk about Ashley's battle with breast cancer - a story of fear, defiance, sorrow and strength.
In 1977, The Young and the Restless' Lorie, Leslie and Peggy Brooks gathered around their mother's hospital bed to say good-bye -- Jennifer Brooks would soon lose her battle with breast cancer in a story that marked the first in-depth treatment of the subject on television, day or night. The compelling narrative -- and the issues it raised -- broke new ground and set a new storytelling standard in daytime television. (First You Cry, the landmark TV movie chronicling newscaster Betty Rollin's real-life struggle with the disease, didn't air till November 1978.)

This summer -- 25 years after Y&R's landmark storyline -- Jaime Lyn Bauer's (Lorie's) return to Genoa City has been exciting on many levels. Not only were many of us thrilled to meet this Y&R icon for the first time, but her character has become embroiled in one of the most romantic love stories ever told: the reunion of Victor and Nikki. Additionally, Jaime's arrival has afforded a wonderful opportunity to revisit 1977 and ask her to share her awareness of how the breast cancer story had impacted the daytime television audience.

"Bill Bell did something that no one else was willing or ready or courageous enough to do. I believe the breast cancer story in '77 was part of what put Y&R on the map," Jaime stated. "I think it started a revolution in daytime because he did a lot of research and was willing to deal with this issue on a serious level. He educated the public using a dramatic story." Jaime smiled and became very animated, recalling what it was like for her to be a part of it all. "It was incredible," she beamed. "I am still very proud of it to this day. I knew at the time it was innovative, but when I look back I realize just how much Bill was willing to confront issues not addressed on other shows."

Without a doubt, The Young and the Restless has consistently distinguished itself in its dramatic and timely depiction of important social issues. Y&R is often fearless in its attempt to accurately and sensitively portray how social issues impact us all on a daily basis. It is with such bravery that the writers for Y&R embarked upon telling the story of Ashley's breast cancer in 2002. I learned from head writer Kay Alden that the writers' focus was never will Ashley survive but rather how will Ashley survive. In developing this story, the writers asked themselves how this strong woman would deal with the harshness and impact of chemotherapy. How would this affect her self-image, her view of the world, her relationships especially with her husband, Brad, and others most significant in her life?

I became curious about Don Diamont's [Brad] overall impression of the story and caught up with him in his dressing room before he went to tape his scenes. He told me how thrilled and gratified he feels to contribute to a story that is saving peoples' lives. Don said he was pleased to see a depiction of how "cancer impacts all aspects of a person's life, not just their physical well-being but also their relationships with their spouse and family. It's a story about how couples need to find a way to communicate effectively about their feelings when someone is given this diagnosis." He went on to say, "Cancer has touched me and my family and when Eileen [Davidson] and I were first approaching this material she knew some of it would be difficult for me." (Don's father and brother both succumbed to cancer. He has been active in a number of charities to raise awareness and funds for a variety of medical research since.) "I have drawn a few times from my own experience," Don continued, "especially in the scene when the doctor first tells Ashley that her tumor is malignant and we are left alone in the room to sort out our feelings. Getting that kind of news in that manner hit really close to home."



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