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Rob Schneider Actor Comedian

Rob Schneider

Rob made a transition from "Saturday Night Live" into a successful Hollywood career. Rob Schneider got his first chance to carry a film with Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (2000), a mistaken identity comedy that was as commercially popular as it was critically eviscerated. The diminutive Schneider, who was born to a Filipino mother and Jewish father in San Francisco on October 31, 1963, got his start in comedy in high school. He began writing sketches when he was 15 and also began appearing at local comedy venues. Inspired by such comics as Richard Pryor, Gene Wilder, Peter Sellars, and Monty Python, Schneider decided to try to make a career out of stand-up. Following high school graduation, the fledgling comedian set off for Europe, where he traveled for a few months until he was robbed in Paris. Scraping together enough cash to make it back to the U.S., Schneider returned to San Francisco and renewed his determination to make it as a comedian. He quickly became active on the comedy circuit, opening for such luminaries as Jay Leno, Jerry Seinfeld, and Dana Carvey. Schneider got his big break in 1990, when he was discovered by SNL producer Lorne Michaels while performing on an HBO comedy special. He was hired on as a writer for SNL in 1991, but he soon began performing his own material as well as writing it. He earned great popularity and lasting fame for his characterizations of "Richard "the Richmeister" Laymer" and "The Sensitive Naked Man," as well as various celebrity impersonations. Schneider stayed with the show until the end of the 1993-1994 season, when he decided to quit in order to pursue his film career.

Following his departure from SNL, Schneider had a sizable supporting role in the Sylvester Stallone vehicle Judge Dredd (1995), but his subsequent film work was limited almost solely to forgettable comedies. In 1996, the comedian returned to television as one of the stars of the short-lived sitcom Men Behaving Badly, but he continued to focus much of his energy on a film career. After appearing in The Waterboy (1998) and Big Daddy (1999), two wildly successful comedies starring fellow-SNL alum Adam Sandler, Schneider starred as the titular hero of Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo, a fish tank cleaner who assumes the identity of a high-living gigolo. Panned by critics as immature and vulgar, Deuce Bigalow nevertheless did decent business in theaters and found a niche after it's subsequent release on home video, prompting Schneider to prepare a sophmore effort, The Animal. Co-starring Survivor contestant turned thespian Colleen Haskell, Schneider's tale of a car accident victim imbued with superhuman powers after being pieced back together with animal organs kept the low-brow rolling while marking his territory among the ranks of the more successful transitions from SNL player to big screen star.

More fun stuff about Rob Schneider

Height 5' 5½" (1.66 m)

Spouse: London King (1988 - 1990) (divorced) 1 child

Likes to wear '70s clothes.

His mother is Filipino. Grew up in San Francisco suburb of Pacifica. Area known as Pedro Point, overlooking Linda Mar Beach.

Graduated from Pacifica's Terra Nova High School.

Youngest of five children.

His mother Pilar, is a former kindergarten teacher who now presides over the town school board.

His father, Marvin is a real estate broker.

Has a sister named April Schneider, born in 1959.

Got his first break with an appearance on "Late Night with David Letterman" (1982) in 1987.

Has a two-bedroom apartment in San Francisco in Nob Hill.

Spends many of his evenings hanging out with his pals working on scripts.

Has a passion for collecting stuff.

His apartment is surrounded by '50s rattan furniture, a tiki lamp and a pair of Eskimo snowshoes.

He honed his act at San Francisco comedy clubs opening for the likes of Jay Leno, Jerry Seinfeld and Dana Carvey.

"Saturday Night Live" producer Lorne Michaels spotted Rob on HBO's "13th Annual Young Comedians Special" in 1990 and signed him up as a writer on SNL.

Has nearly 50 celebrity impersonations and odd voices.

Likes to smoke cigars.

Dated former NBC press representative Jill Barron. [1995]

Insipered by the work of Monty Python, Richard Pryor, Gene Wilder and Peter Sellers.

Dated actress/comedian Julia Sweeney, when both of them were on "Saturday Night Live". [1991-1994]

Has a treasured painting of Jack Lord of "Hawaii Five-O, whom he saw crossing a lobby while on a family vacation in Oahu when he was 8. He found the portrait in a vintage shop in San Francisco.

His brother, John Schneider, is his manager.

Has a collection of Hawaiian shirts.

Co-owns restaurant Eleven in San Francisco.

Has one daughter.

His mother, Pilar Schneider, is featured in a cameo role in "Deuce Bigalow" (as the lady at the restaurant Deuce goes to for his blind date w/Kate).

Drives a silver Porsche Carerra Cabriolet identical to the one he drove in Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (2003)

His mother also has a cameo in "The Hot Chick" as the head judge at the cheerleading conference

Born on the same day as actor Dermot Mulroney.

His mother, Pilar Schneider, also played in his movie, The Animal, as Mrs. De La Rosa.

His personal quotes:

"The real reason I decided on show business was to avoid a day job."

(On why he chose to leave Saturday Night Live in 1994 after four seasons): "It was time to graduate."

"People don't ask Andre Agassi, 'You know you're the No. 1 tennis player in the world ... have you thought about polo?'" - When asked if he'd ever consider a dramatic role.

His Salary
The Animal (2001) $1,000,000+

Rob Schneider Blasts "Pompous" Movie Critic

American comic Rob Schneider has furiously labeled movie critic Patrick Goldstein "unfunny" and "pompous" for his attack on his contribution to cinema. The former Saturday Night Live star has taken out a full-page advertisement in the Hollywood Reporter attacking Goldstein's article on January 26, in which he blasted movie studios for making lackluster sequels like Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo. His verbal assault mirrors Owen Wilson's recent defense of Starsky & Hutch co-star Ben Stiller, who was criticized for his "tiresome" screen presence by New Yorker magazine's David Denby. Schneider writes of Goldstein, "Most of the world (has) no idea of your existence. Maybe you didn't win a Pulitzer Prize because they haven't invented a category for 'Best Third-Rate, Unfunny Pompous Reporter'. I can honestly say that if I sat with your colleagues at a luncheon, afterwards they'd say, 'You know, that Rob Schneider is a pretty intelligent guy' ... whereas, if you sat with my colleagues, after lunch, you would just be beaten beyond recognition." On gossip website Pagesix.Com, Goldstein responds, "I haven't received so many congratulatory phone calls since Billy Crystal wrote a letter to the editor comparing me to Roy Cohn."

Actors Act Up Over Merger Plan

An all-star cast including William Daniels, Elliott Gould, Kent McCord, Diane Ladd, Valerie Harper and Rob Schneider as well as some three dozen other actors, staged a demonstration in front of the headquarters of the Screen Actors Guild Wednesday to protest the union's plans to form a consolidated performers union with the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists. The actors expressed outrage that the union's board refused to allow a dissenting opinion to be presented to the membership in advance of their vote on the consolidation. In an interview with today's (Thursday) Los Angeles Daily News, McCord, the union's treasurer and defacto leader of the opposition, commented: "It's an ill-gotten, ill-conceived concept to give this union away, and we won't stand for it. ... This isn't a solution; it's the creation of another problem." Reporting on Wednesday's protest, today's Hollywood Reporter commented, "It looks as if those in favor of creating the Alliance of International Media Artists [the proposed name of the consolidated union] are going to have a fight on their hands."

Rob Schneider breaks free in 'The Animal'

Summer is the perfect time to check out what is playing at the local movie theater. Before letting that all-too-familiar feeling of summer boredom hit, find a seat in the theater showing a new comedy written by and starring Rob Schneider.

A product of Saturday Night Live (SNL) fame, Schneider is known for his character "the Sensitive Naked Man" as well as hit comedies such as "Men Behaving Badly" and "Deuce Bigalow." Schneider's newest movie is entitled "The Animal."

This movie is a comedy about a nerdy guy named Marvin Mange. Marvin gets into a car crash, which hospitalizes him. The doctors put him back together with animal parts and as a result, he starts to act more like an animal than a human.

In one scene, when he sees a beautiful woman walking down the street, he starts humping the nearest mailbox. Later in the story, the character finds himself in yet another embarrassing situation, in which he meets Rianna, played by Colleen Haskell of "Survivor" fame). Rianna is an environmentalist who recently tried to save a tree by living in it for a year. Eventually the two fall in love.

Schneider never worries about pushing the envelope too far in his movies.

In an online chat, Schneider wrote, "the envelope is made to be pushed too far. You can't be afraid to shock and offend, but that can't be the sole purpose. I have to make myself laugh."

According to Schneider, he learned a lot about comedy from his fellow cast members on SNL, like Adam Sandler and Chris Farley, as well as some of the other greats that have passed through the studio and appeared on the screen.

"Monty Python is the high watermark of comedy in the 20th century," Schneider wrote. "Anyone who disagrees with that is ignorant about comedy."

He also noted that Peter Sellers, Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor were some of his favorites.

The movie was directed by Luke Greenfield and produced by Sandler.

Schneider said of working with Sandler, "He's my friend but also my boss. It's a bit weird, but we've been working together for a dozen years, so we have shorthand. He makes the movie funnier and is a brilliant editor and filmmaker."

Haskell, who plays Schneider's love interest, is new to Hollywood with only "Survivor" and a "Blistex" commercial under her belt, but she has already been dubbed "America's Sweetheart."

During an online chat, Haskell said that making the movie was more fun than "Survivor" because, "the movie was a job, and 'Survivor' was a game show."

A soundtrack for "The Animal" will also be released.

"I'm psyched about the soundtrack," Schneider said. "We got the Wailing Souls, Bob Marley, a song that I want to put on by Train, Cracker, Beastie Boys and a couple new songs that will soon be hitting college radio."

Schneider concluded his online chat with his high hopes for success.

"I put all my eggs in this one 'Animal' movie," he said. "If this doesn't work, I quit. I just want to say that I am in a special place in my career where I care a lot less and, at the same time, a lot more. I want to make films that make people laugh hard, and I am not afraid to walk away from this business tomorrow."

Animalistic Schneider Turns Hot Chick

Ex-stand up comic Rob Schneider has been making a habit of turning into some outrageous characters since he started assuming the leads in some very odd comedies. He became an unlikely gigolo in the box office hit 'Deuce Bigelow', a series of animal parts in last year's 'The Animal', and now with 'The Hot Chick', Schneider is, well, the body of a 17-year old blonde cheerleader in the irreverent comedy. Will the real Rob Schneider please come forward?

"I know that I'm not enough as me; they need more", says Schneider as we chat in a Los Angeles hotel room. Dressed in a bright red shirt and black slacks, the ex-Saturday Night Live alumni and best pal with one Adam Sandler, seems to enjoy being thrust into comically weird situations. "It's all about finding new ways to make me suffer and be uncomfortable, I guess", says a smiling Schneider in between gulps of mineral water.

The premise of 'The Hot Chick' revolves around a popular yet mean-spirited teenage girl who wakes up one day to find herself turned into a man in his 30's (Schneider). Along the way to finding out how she ended up like that (and how to get back into her own body), she discovers how shallow and cruel she's always been. Schneider laughingly recalls how this film originated.

"Tom [Brady, co-writer/director] saw me making fun of my ex-girlfriend one time and thought it would make a good movie," he recalls. But Schneider thought it was risky. "It was like a high wire act, in that if it didn't work it's not going to work in a BIG way, so I knew there was a real potential for a $20m misfire." As to what it was about his ex-girlfriend that clearly inspired such comic lunacy, Schneider says it's all about a woman's energy. "I don't know how women have that much energy, just bouncing off the walls. It was just so tiring that the only thing I could do to defend myself from it was to make fun of it", he explains.

Schneider spent hours studying teenage girls. "Now that the court case is over I can talk about it," he quips. "I honestly and arrogantly thought I knew women before this, but it's not like I know them now, but there's things about women that I never noticed before," he admits with a degree of self-mocking embarrassment. "Such as the way a woman makes eye contact which is so far more intense than a man, not to mention the way that a woman is hypersensitive to everything around her," meaning, Schneider hastens to explain, "there's a feeling that women are looking at them all the time which is great, so I used that. Men don't do that, unless they're vainly homosexual."

Schneider had to tread a fine line here and keep away from being clichéd, "so I had to avoid playing it like a gay man, because that would be tired and predictable, so I wanted to play it like a younger girl." That involved including the mean-spiritedness that can often lurk within the psyche of the teenage girl. "There is definitely a viciousness and meanness that is right under the surface with adolescent girls, so with this movie, we also wanted to explore the ideas of acceptance and love. If you dig deeply into any of these storylines, you'll find love and acceptance as part of that." But he also warns not to dig TOO deeply. After all, "we weren't setting out to make a message movie but a funny film." Yet one that he hopes audiences will identify with. "This girl's got it easy. She's a pretty girl who's got it easier than most people and that's a fact and I think in some ways, that's going to bite her in the ass if she wakes up a man and those looks are gone. I thought that was somewhat interesting."

Perhaps in reality, Schneider was able to study the younger female psyche in his own backyard - or bedroom. After all, he recently married a young woman whom he admits "is somewhat in her early twenties who has another worldly elegance that I can only admire." The 39-year old actor, who was married once before and has a son from that marriage, laughs when it's suggested that his latest marriage has turned him into a more mature, gentler soul. "I don't think my wife would agree with that at all, but I would hope so. One thing I learned from doing this movie is that if you spend a day through the eyes of a woman and how a woman looks at life, women will love you for it. I genuinely try and please my wife but instead of getting bonus points for that she says: Why do you try, why not just do it? You never figure it out, but if you're LUCKY, you can be frustrated with it your whole life."

Schneider admits that his wife has a similar sense of humour to his own "or at least I thought so when I first got into the marriage. I just have to learn to be more appropriate, and not get too many laughs at her expense. It's a wonderful ballet that I'm still trying to figure out."

Personally, life couldn't get any better for the irreverent Mr Schneider and professionally, he's not doing too badly either, unwilling to necessarily switch gears like pal Adam Sandler. Why give up on a good thing? "I think we'll be doing a sequel to 'Deuce Bigelow' next. I have a great title, but no movie yet. 'Deuce Bigelow, Electric Gigolo' makes ME laugh," chuckles Schneider. He says he doesn't have a burning need to seek acceptance on a different level, as Sandler recently did with 'Punch Drunk Love'. Schneider loves to make people laugh, end of story. "There's nothing more rewarding, that I can think of, than going into the movie theatre and just hearing the audience roaring, as I used to when I saw films like 'Young Frankenstein'."

Rob Schneider: The Hot Chick

The comedian talks about getting in touch with his feminine side to play The Hot Chick.
December 12, 2002 - "The one thing I can say about this movie – to men at least – is that you should try to go through one day of your life and see things through the eyes of a woman," says comedian Rob Schneider, sitting down recently with journalists in Los Angeles to discuss his new film The Hot Chick, in which he plays a teenage girl trapped in a grown man's body. "Try to make the attempt to understand what women feel – you're never going to succeed, but women will love you for it." Then he adds with a smile: "I sure tried. Though this movie hasn't helped my relationship at all."

Coming off such comedy hits as Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo and The Animal, his "dual role" in The Hot Chick – as a sleazy criminal and as the cheerleader who ends up in his body – presented a peculiar set of physical and emotive challenges. "Women have an excitability and energy that men just don't have," he explains. "Men hold their energy in reserve, but the energy of women just seems to create more energy. I love women and I love being around that kind of energy."

Schneider goes on to elaborate his take on the character: "No man is a hundred-percent masculine and no woman is a hundred-percent feminine – we're all just somewhere on the scale there. So what I tried to do was just play it with an innocence and gentleness, and then find some physical keys to lock-in on.

"For example," he continues, "women's eye contact is more intense than men's. Their movements are smoother and more gentle – everything that women do tends to be more precise."
Having finished up The Hot Chick, which features some of Schneider's biggest acting challenges to date, the natural question is will he ever tackle a serious dramatic role, along the lines of his friend Adam Sandler's much-acclaimed turn in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love this year? "I don't feel the need the way some comedians do to be accepted as a serious actor after they've been accepted in comedy. I just don't have that aching desire," he states (and, indeed, his next project is planned to be a Deuce Bigalow sequel that he and his Hot Chick director Tom Brady are just starting to write). "But, that said, if there was an interesting dramatic role for me, I'd definitely consider it."

 

Rob Schneider: The Animal

The Animal , starring Rob Schneider, is the kind of film that many critics find difficult coming to grips with. In fact, Christy Lemire of the Associated Press, who clearly loathed the film, comments early on in her review: "You know that no matter what you write, people will scurry to this movie in droves." Megan Rosenfeld of the Washington Post points out that those "people" are "specifically, adolescent, pre-adolescent and post-adolescent boys." For Rosenberg, however, the film is "a cretinous enterprise." On the other hand, Kevin Thomas (who was the only major-city film critic to give Pearl Harbor a positive review last week) comments that the movie "is an outrageous and imaginative summer comedy aimed primarily at young males, but it is often so funny that it may well connect to a broader audience."

Adam Sandler To Produce Comedy Frankenstein

Waterboy, The (1998) star 'Adam Sandler' is set to produce a comedy remake of FRANKENSTEIN called THE ANIMAL - after earning millions of dollars from his most recent production Deuce Bigalow (2000). Sandler, who produced, co-edited and co-wrote Deuce, is teaming up again with the writer and lead actor Rob Schneider - and filming starts this September. Schneider, who shared a dressing room with Sandler on SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE, explains the plot: "This guy's driving in the mountains and gets in a terrible car crash. Then this mad beast comes and rips him out of the car, takes him into this converted barn and puts him back together with different animal parts... The animals come alive in him and he keeps waking up in different places to discover things have been killed in the town, and viciously eaten." The duo hope to sign MONTY PYTHON star Michael Palin to co-star in the movie.


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