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Owen Wilson Actor

Owen Wilson

The hot star is quickly rising to Hollywood stardom, passing by his brother, actor Luke Wilson. Whether he's acting or co-writing brilliantly quirky character studies with director/writing partner Wes Anderson, Owen C. Wilson's work exudes an insouciant yet earnest charm and eccentric comic sensibility, making him one of the most promising new talents to emerge in the 1990s. Born and reared in Dallas, Wilson raised enough hell in high school to get expelled from one institution in tenth grade, but he managed to attend college at the University of Texas in Austin and graduate in 1991. Along with his degree, Wilson's Austin years resulted in a budding partnership with a like-minded creative classmate, aspiring filmmaker Wes Anderson. Their first film together, a short about a bookstore heist called Bottle Rocket, played at the Sundance Film Festival in 1993, attracting the attention of producer Polly Platt and writer/director James L. Brooks. With Brooks' support, Wilson and Anderson expanded the short into a feature, indie cult favorite Bottle Rocket (1996). Though it made little impression at the box office, Anderson and Wilson's distinctly offbeat, wry, and optimistic tale about aspiring criminal Dignan and his best friend Anthony (played by Wilson's brother Luke Wilson) earned ardent fans among cineastes. Wilson's inspired performance as Dignan, not to mention his blond hair, large grin, and affable drawl, became his Hollywood calling card. That same year, Wilson also began a fertile association with actor/director Ben Stiller, appearing in one memorable scene as a smooth, ill-fated date in Stiller's black comedy The Cable Guy (1996).

Alternating between supporting roles in Hollywood spectacles, collaborations with Anderson and Stiller, and smaller independent projects, Wilson worked steadily for the rest of the 1990s. Though he always seemed to fill the generic slot of Guy Marked for Death, Wilson still managed to bring a reliably laid-back, humorous spark to the bombastic proceedings in Anaconda (1997), Armageddon (1998), and The Haunting (1999). On a more artistically successful front, Wilson's next script with Anderson resulted in the lauded coming-of-age film Rushmore (1998). With its singular cast of characters, distinctive combination of deadpan humor and true emotion, and superb performances by Jason Schwartzman as teen prodigy Max Fischer and Bill Murray as depressed millionaire Blume, Rushmore earned prizes from the critics (if not the Academy) and proved that Bottle Rocket was no fluke. As far as acting, Wilson's ability to suggest complexity beneath a breezy surface earned positive notice for his unsettling performance as a laconic, self-styled Good Samaritan serial killer in indie thriller The Minus Man (1999).

By 2000, Wilson began to take center stage in larger Hollywood projects as well. Though it was another Jackie Chan vehicle, Wilson's hilarious co-starring turn as a surfer dude-tinged outlaw in the chop sockey Western Shanghai Noon (2000) nearly stole the movie. Wilson's brief appearance as a Jesus-loving, super rich romantic rival to Ben Stiller's put-upon Greg Focker was a comic highlight of the hit Meet the Parents (2000). Stiller's supermodel farce Zoolander (2001) further sealed Wilson's status as a superlative comic actor. As Zoolander's rival Hansel, Wilson's offbeat timing made him the ultimate bubble-headed mannequin; his catwalk competition with Stiller provided the biggest laughs in a hit-or-miss movie. Even as he flourished in broad Hollywood comedy, Wilson continued his partnership with Wes Anderson, co-writing with Anderson and co-starring (with his brother and Stiller among others) in the unusual family story The Royal Tennenbaums (2001). Branching out into serious roles, Wilson then co-starred with The Royal Tennenbaums patriarch Gene Hackman in the military drama Behind Enemy Lines (2001). An increasingly prevalent figure in acton films following the millennial turnover, Wilson followed Behind Enemy Lines with I Spy (2002) and the Shanghai Noon sequel Shanghai Knights (2003) before appearing opposite Morgan Freeman in The Big Bounce and gearing up for the belated big screen adaptation of Starsky & Hutch.

Owen was born on November 18, 1968, in Dalls, Texas, USA.

Wilson Joining Two New Comedies

Owen Wilson (Wedding Crashers) has closed deals to topline and produce a pair of comedy spec scripts sold: Stalker -- A Love Story at Paramount Pictures and Me, You and Dupree at Universal Pictures.

Stalker -- A Love Story, from writers Michael Carnes and Josh Gilbert, centers on a man who, after realizing too late that he's let the perfect woman get away, tries to win her back in all the wrong ways.

Me, You and Dupree, by Michael Lesieur, revolves around a troubled newlywed couple whose problems are magnified when the groom's out-of-work meddlesome best man moves in and begins competing with him.

Wilson has also optioned journalist John Falk's book "Hello to All That: A Memoir of War, Zoloft, and Peace," and plans to star in and produce the adaptation.

Owen Wilson: The 70s Are Back!

If Owen Wilson were any more laid back he would fall onto the plush carpet of the central London hotel where he and Starsky & Hutch co-star Ben Stiller are ensconced to promote their remake of the classic 70s cop show. His laconic drawl and casual manner which we are becoming more and more familiar with from his onscreen appearances seem to reflect the real Wilson, as much as any of the characters he has played. A perfect foil then to Stiller's more intense persona, which has seen the two of them co-star in no less than six films together.

As the relaxed Hutch to Stiller's by-the-book Starsky, Wilson plays the joker when it comes to being interviewed. Director Todd Phillips' movie pays homage to the series while gently poking fun at it, and while Stiller was first on board in terms of casting, it's Wilson who takes away the comic spoils, much like he did in the pair's last outing, the ill-fated Zoolander. For example, while Stiller recalls how he spent time in his trailer watching repeats of the show so that he could become Paul Michael Glaser, Wilson admits that his favourite scene in the film was his threesome with Carmen Electra and Amy Smart. "That was a very challenging scene", he jokes. "I had to make sure we shot it several times so that we got it just right."

One of the many comedic highlights of the film sees Wilson playing guitar and crooning Don't Give Up On Us Baby, the song made famous by David Soul in 1978. But Wilson admits that he has no plans to start a singing career of his own. "I can't play guitar or sing, so they had to film it from the chest up and put my voice through a special tuning machine".

It's readily apparent however that the two stars feed off each other personally and creatively. Wilson admits that he relies on his partner in comedy for creative inspiration, while Stiller jokes about Wilson's desire to leave early every day. "He's always suggesting ways in which he can leave a scene as soon as possible, or even just sit down half way through so that he can take the load off his feet."
Both actors are hugely aware that they are taking something of a risk by bringing such a sacred cow back to life. They admit that having the blessing of original stars Paul Michael Glaser and David Soul was integral to the project. "We always wanted them to be involved," says Stiller. "Paul is Starsky and I met him before shooting. He was very kind and encouraged us to go with what we wanted to do." But both confess to suffering nerves when the two turned up to film a short cameo for the end of the film. "It was strange and intimidating when they turned up on set," adds Stiller, "but it was very sweet to see them back with the car after twenty five years."

With the aforementioned Ford Gran Torino parked outside the hotel, both actors are keen to make a splash at the London premiere. While Stiller says that he loved driving the car, it was the 70s fashion that rubbed off on Wilson. "I found myself wearing the shirts out to dinner." And as for any suggestion that there is a homo-erotic subtext to the film, Wilson as the last laugh: "It's not that much of a subtext!"

The Life Aquatic with Owen Wilson

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou tells the story of a celebrity marine biologist called Steve Zissou (Bill Murray). Steve's career and life are falling apart as his documentaries are no longer popular. His marital relations are pretty glum and his lifelong mentor (Cassel) was just killed by a big fish.

The film opens in Italy as Steve is showing footage of his documentary-in-progress to a black tie audience. He is hoping to receive funding but the response isn't very positive. At the after-show party, a young pilot named Ned (Owen Wilson) introduces himself to Steve. Ned thinks that Steve is possibly his father.

Ned quickly becomes part of the Zissou team, an eclectic group of interns and characters. The entire team sport red wooly hats and comic uniforms. After Ned donates money to fund the documentary, Team Zissou set sail on an expedition. Their mission is to hunt out the possibly non-existant Jaguar Shark that killed Zissou's partner.

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is highly entertaining with the supporting cast providing ample comedic support for Murray's excellent performance. Willem Dafoe plays and eccentric and loyal assistant to Steve. His estranged wife (Anjelica Huston) and highly successful rival (Jeff Goldblum) perform well. Cate Blanchett plays a heavily pregnant journalist who joins the team in search of a story.

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is the closing film of the Dublin Film Festival.

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou opens on February 25th.

Owen Wilson denies alcoholism rumors

Research and real life don't mix; at least, not for Owen Wilson. The 36-year-old Royal Tenenbaums star has recently slammed reports that he is under intensive treatment to overcome alcohol addiction.

According to IMDb.com, Wilson admits that he has attended Alcoholics Anonymous meetings in a research capacity only and that he does not consider himself a recovering alcoholic. "It definitely helps people but it's probably not great for somebody at AA to talk to the press - and I don't think I'm an alcoholic," says Wilson.
Wilson can currently be seen in Meet the Fockers and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. No word on what role the actor was researching when he became a friend of Bill.

Owen Wilson Says 'Hello' to War Book

Owen Wilson, who has teamed with director Wes Anderson to write several projects including "Rushmore" and "The Royal Tenenbaums," has purchased someone else's words to bring to the big screen.

The 36-year-old actor has optioned journalist John Falk's book "Hello to All That: A Memoir of War, Zoloft, and Peace," report news sources.

In the novel, Falk describes how his lifetime of depression spurred him to try and escape his "pointless" life by plunging into a life of adventure. He enters Sarajevo during the 1993 civil war and through numerous false starts and mistakes begins to create a career for himself as a war journalist. Throughout the experience, he matures as man and reporter.
Although many have been interested in optioning Falk's book, Wilson's enthusiasm won in the end. Wilson hasn't confirmed whether he'll adapt the project himself, but plans to star and produce the movie.

Wilson currently appears in "The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou" and "Meet the Fockers." He next stars alongside Vince Vaughn in the upcoming romantic comedy "The Wedding Crashers," which will be released in July.

Owen Wilson: Starsky & Hutch


“ The chemistry that I built up with Carmen and Amy on the kissing scene, I lost with the singing scene ”

It was in the mid 90s when Owen Wilson teamed up with writer/director Wes Anderson to co-pen his debut film Bottle Rocket. Although it didn't make a dent at the box office, it showcased Owen's gift for comedy as both a writer and actor. He later re-teamed with Anderson to script the acclaimed Rushmore and played buddy with Jackie Chan for Shanghai Noon, and its sequel Shanghai Knights. He's also co-starred with real-life buddy Ben Stiller in Meet The Parents, The Royal Tenenbaums, Zoolander, and now a remake of everybody's favourite 70s cop show, Starsky & Hutch.

Apparently your favourite scene in Starsky & Hutch is the one in which you 'share yourself' with Amy Smart and Carmen Electra. Is that right?

Mm. The scene with Carmen Electra and Amy Smart ended up being very challenging just because I wanted to make sure we got it right and so... A lot of takes, a lot of rehearsals, and you know, I showed up early that day. It was worth it, you know? Because I think we got it right. I think we nailed it...

Your rendition of David Soul's Don't Give Up On Us is also a classic scene. How did you prepare for that?

Now, for the singing... The singing was, uh... Todd wanted me to take guitar lessons and have a voice coach and I said: "I can't sing." Ben thought that was just me not wanting to prepare, but I really can't sing - and I can't play the guitar. The poor guys who were giving me my guitar lessons quickly realised that I couldn't do it either, so Todd shot it so you wouldn't see my hands. Then they ran my voice through one of those tuning machines and I felt the chemistry that I built up with Carmen and Amy on the kissing scene, I lost with the singing scene. I could just see the interest just sort of flicker out of their eyes when they heard me warble. There will be an album.

How does David Soul feel about your rendering of Hutch?

I said to David before the premiere, "Now, don't expect too much." I was very nervous to have him hear me sing and uh... Actually he was very generous after the movie, and gave me a hug. I think he realised that I wasn't a threat.

So the hugging went on off screen as well as on! Do you think the film might start some sort of touchy feely trend among men?

I think a more significant trend that might have begun is men crying as they hug and then denying that they're crying.

You and Ben Stiller have worked together many times. What are the advantages of that?

For me it's just working with someone who I can rely on - someone I think is not just going to come up with good stuff, but have good ideas for me also. That isn't so much a factor of us having worked together a lot, because we had that from the very beginning. We just have a very similar sense of humour. Similar tastes, I guess.

You're always riding shotgun in the car - didn't Ben ever let you take it for a spin?

I was allowed to sit behind the wheel of the car as long as the keys were in Ben's pocket in his trailer. But you know Ben is not a good driver. He doesn't have very good reflexes, or any hand-eye coordination. The thing is, it's like Ben would come back all excited saying, "Oh, I learned how to do a 'power slide'!" Or, "Hey, today we're gonna do a '180'!" What I came to learn is that what the rest of us call 'fender benders' and 'accidents' is what Ben has a technical term for.

What about the wardrobe - did you manage to filch a few shirts?

Yeah. I don't know if Todd will remember this, but we were out to dinner and I was wearing one of my wardrobe shirts - in Los Angeles at Orso's - and I was talking to Todd and he was like, "Is that one of the shirts!?" I was kind of embarrassed but I like those clothes actually. When I tried them on in my first costume fitting I felt sort of ree-diculous, but then I started to get into it and started to get a lot of compliments.

So you see yourself as a bit of a sex symbol then?

I don't know. I hope! We'll see. Um... It's so early in the process... I'm going to New York City next so I'll give you a report.

Owen Wilson: Shanghai Knights

Owner of the most carbuncular schnozz since Jimmy Durante, Owen Wilson's stoner persona hides a canny mind that has helped him conquer Hollywood on several fronts. As co-writer of "Rushmore" and "The Royal Tenenbaums", star of "Behind Enemy Lines" and Ben Stiller's comic foil, he's a likeable actor who can jump effortlessly between offbeat indies and mainstream products. Now he's back with Jackie Chan in "Shanghai Knights", the sequel to their hit martial arts western, "Shanghai Noon".

Jackie's been known to injure himself while performing his own stunts. Did you ever fear for his safety while shooting "Shanghai Knights"?

I don't worry about Jackie making it through - he's made it this far. Actually, I look forward to the stunts being as elaborate and drawn-out as possible, because it gives me a chance to catch my breath. The outtakes at the end of the movie are pretty revealing though, because you usually see Jackie getting hurt or something going awry.

You do get to do one stunt though, being dunked in water upside down...

I grew up near the ocean so I'm pretty comfortable in the water. And even though I don't think of myself as particularly great at the action stuff, I would give myself credit for that one scene where I felt I was a little stronger than Jackie.

How does working with Jackie compare to working with your regular collaborator, Wes Anderson?

People talk about how these movies are very different from the stuff I wrote with Wes, but in some important ways there are similarities. Jackie's character has a real sense of innocence to him, and the comedy isn't mean-spirited or "cool". And I'd say that's also in "Tenenbaums" and "Rushmore".

What's next for you and Jackie?

Jackie's getting ready to start working on "Around the World in 80 Days" with Steve Coogan. My brother Luke and I might do a cameo as the Wright brothers. Then I'm doing "Starsky & Hutch" with Ben Stiller.

Is there a third "Shanghai" picture on the cards?

The next one will be "Shanghai Dawn", and we're talking about going to Egypt. It's like Hope and Crosby - you can put these characters into different situations and genres and know how they're going to behave.

Owen Wilson: I-Spy

Owen Wilson co-wrote the offbeat comedies "Rushmore" and "The Royal Tennebaums", but he's best known for starring roles in "Behind Enemy Lines", "Shanghai Noon", and "Zoolander". Now he embarks on an even more perilous venture; a film with Eddie Murphy...

You get to spoof our beloved 007...

Yeah. I get to poke fun at James Bond a little bit. I grew up with James Bond and Inspector Clouseau. They are the two opposite ends of the spectrum and this film is kind of somewhere in between. There's action and a lot of comedy. The action is sort of an excuse to get to the funny stuff.

Eddie Murphy says the key to the film is the chemistry between your characters. How did you work together?

Our characters are really different. I found we were simpatico, humour-wise. So when we were sitting around on the set we had the same kind of humour, the same kind of approach to the comedy. The difference between the two guys, I guess, is that Eddie's character is more flamboyant. My guy is more of an everyman spy, an ordinary guy who's a spy, and the two characters complement and play well off each other.

There are some fun gadgets in the film. What's your favourite?

The gadgets are great. We have these contact lenses - if I put one in my eye, and one in your eye, then you can see what I see. It leads to a really funny scene where Eddie's character is helping me with a girl I have a crush on. I think that's the funniest scene in the movie.

Owen Wilson defends Ben Stiller

Owen Wilson has spoken out against criticism aimed at his Zoolander co-star, Ben Stiller.

Wilson has taken exception to the words of David Denby, a reporter for New Yorker magazine, who described Stiller in Meet The Fockers as being the "crudest version of the urban Jewish male on the make."

He went on to say: "Stiller is not a natural comic. He's not effortlessly funny. There's nothing wrong with the features, but they don't quite go together."

In response, Pagesix.com reports Wilson as saying: "I read David Denby's piece on Ben Stiller with great interest. Not because it was good or fair toward my friend, but exactly because it wasn't.

"I've acted in 237 buddy movies and, with that experience, I've developed an almost preternatural feel for the beats that any good buddy movie must have. And maybe the most crucial audience-rewarding beat is where one buddy comes to the aid of the other guy to help defeat a villain. Or bully. Or jerk. Someone the audience can really root against. How could an audience not be dying for a real 'Billy Jack' moment of reckoning for Denby after he dismisses or diminishes or just plain insults practically everything Stiller has ever worked on?

"And not letting it rest there, in true bully fashion Denby moves on to take some shots at the way Ben looks and even his Jewish-ness, describing him as the 'latest, and crudest, version of the urban Jewish male on the make'. The audience is practically howling for blood! I really wish I could deliver for them - but that's Jackie Chan's role."

Wedding Crashers

John Beckwith and Jeremy Klein, a pair of committed womanizers who sneak into weddings to take advantage of the romantic tinge in the air, find themselves at odds with one another when John meets and falls for Claire Clearly.

Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson star as two divorce mediators who crash weddings looking for Ms. Right Now. Rachel McAdams stars as the girl who Vaughn “falls” for and her bizarre politician dad is played by Christopher Walken. Will Ferrall also stars in an unknown role but I’m assuming it’s just a cameo.

Well, forget all the potential mushy romantic stuff I described above. The trailer focuses entirely on the stuff the guys want to see: booze, babes, and corny angles to get the girls into bed. I might have to bring a pad and pencil. I might need some pointers!

Wedding Crashers hits theatres on July 22, 2005. To see the trailer, click below. Scroll down to see some images from the movie as well.

The Royal Mr. Owen Wilson

Owen Wilson is rapidly emerging as one of Hollywood's bright young stars. Also a screenwriter, Wilson first drew acclaim as co-writer of all three Wes Anderson films, including his latest, The Royal Tenenbaums.

Born and reared in Dallas, Wilson raised enough hell in high school to get expelled from one institution in tenth grade, but he managed to attend college at the University of Texas in Austin and graduate in 1991. Along with his degree, Wilson's Austin years resulted in a budding partnership with aspiring filmmaker Wes Anderson. Their first film together, a short about a bookstore heist called Bottle Rocket, played at the Sundance Film Festival in 1993, attracting the attention of producer Polly Platt and writer/director James L. Brooks. With Brooks' support, Wilson and Anderson expanded the short into a feature and Bottle Rocket (1996). Though it made little impression at the box office, this distinctly offbeat comedy became something of a cult favourite. Wilson's own inspired performance became his Hollywood calling card. That same year, Wilson also began a fertile association with actor/director Ben Stiller, appearing in one memorable scene as a smooth, ill-fated date in Stiller's black comedy The Cable Guy (1996).

Alternating between supporting roles in Hollywood spectacles, collaborations with Anderson and Stiller, and smaller independent projects, Wilson worked steadily for the rest of the 1990s adding much needed humour in Anaconda (1997), Armageddon (1998), and The Haunting (1999). On a more artistically successful front, Wilson's next script with Anderson resulted in the lauded coming-of-age film Rushmore (1998). As far as acting, Wilson's scored as a serial killer in the indie thriller The Minus Man (1999).

By 2000, Wilson began to take centre stage in larger Hollywood projects as well. Though it was another Jackie Chan vehicle, Wilson's hilarious co-starring turn in the Western Shanghai Noon (2000) nearly stole the movie. Wilson worked twice with pal Ben Stiller in Meet the Parents (2000), followed by Stiller's supermodel farce Zoolander. Even as he flourished in broad Hollywood comedy, Wilson continued his partnership with Wes Anderson, co-writing with Anderson and co-starring (with his brother and Stiller among others) in the black comedy The Royal Tenenbaums (2001). Branching out into serious roles, Wilson will also be with The Royal Tenenbaums patriarch Gene Hackman in the military drama Behind Enemy Lines (2001), in which he plays a pilot shot down in Bosnia and on the run from corrupt soldiers and a malevolent sniper.

The busy Wilson took time off to discuss both films with Paul Fischer.

Can you begin by discussing how and why Hackman got you involved with Behind Enemy Lines and if that led to you hiring him for Royal Tenenbaums?
Gene liked me in Shanghai Noon and recommended me. For Behind Enemy Lines. I agreed to do it so they recommended me for THAT. We'd always wanted him for the Royal Tenenbaums and Wes finally persuaded him during Behind Enemy Lines.
Were you then able to chip away at him?
Well, no. By the time I'd met him in Slovakia, he had already agreed that he would do the movie.
Is Gene Hackman now your adopted father?
Ah, no. He's not. It's funny. The reason I really was excited about working on Behind Enemy Lines is because of him, but we didn't have that much stuff together because he's on the ship and I'm behind enemy lines. [laugher all around] And we talked by radio and stuff, so we didn't do a lot of stuff together.
You're not really perceived as an action hero, yet you have done a few films in which that comes through. Was the attraction of Behind Enemy Lines the opportunity to reflect the action hero within?
No, not really. The attraction was more to work with Gene Hackman in that it so happened to be this, you know, genre of a movie. In fact, it was a sort of, a more difficult movie to do because I felt less in control than when doing a movie where you're doing lots of scenes with actors and you kind of have a sense that it's working or being funny. And in this it was just having to rely on the director, because you'd show up at work and, you know, get run through a land mine. You run do this and you don't know how it's all going to fit together because he's got it all in his mind so it all comes down to whether or not he can make it exciting.
How physically daunting was it to shoot this?
It was more like playing sports in high school. Kind of like gearing up every day; that was kind of the feeling that I had. Get your adrenaline flowing. That was the only thing I could relate it to because obviously I've never been in this type of combat situation. I could just relate to the kind of adrenaline you get playing sports and stuff.
Where do these quirky films comes from that you and Wes work on?
We kind of do stuff that comes naturally to us. And the stuff that seems to come naturally is stuff that, I don't know exactly how you would describe it, but I know the humor is not really clinical or mean-spirited. It seems to come more from enthusiasm or earnestness. I don't know.
Where does the humor actually come from?
The things that Wes and I find funny are, derived from characters we all knew and grew up with.
What particular challenges did you face creating the multitude of characters in Tenenbaums?
Well, trying to write an ensemble movie, rather than focusing on one thing, and it ended up pretty much being Gene Hackman's movie, I think. But early on we didn't quite know how it was going to work out.
As with Rushmore, you're coming out at that Oscar time of year. While Rushmore was shut out of the Oscars, you think you have a better shot this time round?
Well, I saw the movie, I guess, a couple months ago and Bottle Rocket was really hard for me to see because it was so weird to see yourself and stuff. But this one I really loved. I don't know how other people will react to it. I would hope that Gene Hackman will get some recognition.
Going back to Behind Enemy Lines, the film's date has been pushed forward for that. Is the time right to see a war film of this kind given recent events?
I would think so, yeah. I think that after September 11th there's a sort of natural surge of patriotism that happened and pushed through a sort of collective tragedy where the whole country sort of comes together. I mean, you saw it particularly in New York in the few days after. Behind Enemy Lines is not a movie about corruption in the military or anything like that. I can't believe that there hasn't been a movie called Behind Enemy Lines; it's such an obvious title.
Are you still doing the sequel to Shanghai Noon?
Yeah, in February.
Shooting in Ireland, right?
Well, it's supposed to be England, you know, if we go back to Jack the Ripper time. I don't know where, maybe Prague and London. I would like it to be Dublin, to be Ireland, because that's where my ancestors are from and I think I get along good with Irish people. The director on Behind Enemy Lines was Irish.
Are you and Wes writing something right now?
No, we're not working on anything now. We have some ideas for like a western and then yeah, a story with the ocean as the backdrop.


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