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Meagan Good Star

Meagan Good, co-star of the "D.E.B.S." Movie!

The exotic star with a knockout body gets her looks from a mix of Italian, French, Indian, Black and Puerto Rican heritage. Meagan Monique Good was born in 8 August 1981 in Panorama, California, USA. She began appearing on commercials at the age of four. Then started guest-starring on series like The Parent Hood, Touched by an Angel, Moesha, The Steve Harvey Show and The Division. She also starred in Raising Dad with Bob Saget. Meagan Good earned critical acclaim for her performance in Kasi Lemmons' EVE'S BAYOU (opposite Samuel L. Jackson), for which she received an NAACP Image Award nomination. She was recently seen in Reggie Rock Bythewood's BIKER BOYZ, starring alongside Laurence Fishburne, Kid Rock, and Orlando Jones.
Meagan Good has completed filming Craig Ross Jr.'s RIDE OR DIE, starring with Duane Martin and Vivica A. Fox. Her other film credits include Holly Goldberg Sloan's THE SECRET LIFE OF GIRLS, Chris Stokes' HOUSE PARTY 4: DOWN TO THE LAST MINUTE, D.J. Pooh's 3 STRIKES, and DELIVER US FROM EVA.

Plaid Girls

Deadly, Evil-Bashing Supervixens ... Dangerous Effeminates Bringing Sassiness ... Double-Edged Beauties Spying. Sure, the secret government organization known as D.E.B.S. actually stands for Discipline, Energy, Beauty, Strength, but any of those other descriptions would fit just as well. On March 25, these teenage girls with short skirts and long guns hit movie theaters in a comedy thriller that promises to speed up pulses in more ways than one. We spoke with two of their top agents, Meagan Good and Sara Foster, to learn about SAT scores, digitally altered undergarments, and why Charlie's Angels had better not step to them.
MTV: So, what exactly are the D.E.B.S.?

Sara Foster: The D.E.B.S. are a fun group of girls who have genuine love for each other, and who are kind of all brought together to fight crime.

Meagan Good: The D.E.B.S. are like the CIA or the FBI, except they come in Catholic [school]girl uniforms and took a test that was hidden in the SATs that helped them, or the powers that be, to realize that we are the perfect cheaters, liars and killers.

MTV: This movie is being described as "Charlie's Angels" with teenage girls.

Good: The whole D.E.B.S. thing kind of reminds me of like "Charlie's Angels" meets "Austin Powers" meets "Bring It On."

MTV: What were your thoughts when you first saw the uniforms?

Good: My character, Max, like, my outfit was totally her because it was the combat boots, it was the skirt that was short, but it wasn't as short as [co-star] Devon [Aoki]'s skirt, and I had the wife-beater. I had to pump up and get a little muscle for it so I could look like a little superhero.
Foster: The first time I saw the outfits, my first thought was "I need a trainer; these skirts are really short." I remember I said to the costumer, to the wardrobe people, "Do you think I could maybe wear some nylons?" But my skirt wasn't as short as some of the others, as Devon's.

MTV: So they had you guys hit the gym pretty hard, then?

Good: Yeah, it was like my first time, really. I'd never really worked out, and so for that role I went [to the gym] for probably about four months and drank protein shakes and everything to put on some weight so I could get some muscle-y arms or muscle-y legs.

MTV: Wearing those tiny skirts, jumping in and out of vehicles and running around, there must have been some pretty revealing outtakes.

Good: Oh yeah. We had a lot of stuff digitally removed.

MTV: So who wins in a fight: the D.E.B.S. or the Angels?

Foster: Oh my God, the D.E.B.S. because those Charlie's Angels, you know, they ... our looks are deceiving. We're a lot tougher than we look. We all might be small, but we have the mental willpower. Not that the Charlie's Angels don't, but I'd say this: There's four of us and three of them. It's us for sure.

Good: I'd say the D.E.B.S., because you haven't seen our best moves yet. We've got "D.E.B.S. II" coming.

MTV: So there's already talk of a sequel? And you'd both be coming back?

Good: Uh-huh.

Foster: I think our director has a sequel. I know she has it in her head. I think she's in the process of writing it. This movie is coming out, and I think it's the kind of movie that you're going to get it or you don't, and the people that get it are going to go back and see it multiple times. I already know people who have seen it more than once, just kind of going from festival to festival. We're not trying to make "The Godfather" here. We're not trying to cure cancer; we're having fun. The biggest compliment I got was from someone who said, "I literally didn't even realize it — I had a smile on my face from beginning to end." And that's the biggest compliment you can get, you know? If the movie does well then I think there's a good chance to make a sequel.

MTV: What real-life mission would the D.E.B.S. be perfect for?

Foster: I think if anyone could find Bin Laden, it's us. We could just coax him with our — with [Meagan]'s good luck, my charm, be like, "Come on. It's OK. We're not going to tell."

MTV: So, Meagan, how did you score the biggest gun in the movie? Did you pay off the prop guy?

Good: Actually, it was kind of pre-thought of, except they didn't expect the person who got Max to be as small as I am, but it actually worked out. In between takes I would use the gun as a weight to build muscles on my arm. When I went to the shooting range to start shooting, they were like, "You know, I think this gun is going to be a little heavy for you. Let's just give you a smaller one." I was like, "No, no, I'll take this one." [It was] actually pretty heavy, but it kind of added to her character, having the whole Napoleon complex.

MTV: These girls are recruited by the government through a secret test built into the SATs. How did you score, back in the day?

Foster: I didn't do that bad, to be honest with you. I was really nervous and I didn't prepare as much as I probably should have. I think I got like a 1,250, which when I was taking the test was pretty normal, but nowadays, you know, it's normal to get a perfect score. It was unbelievable, and now getting a 1,600 is not that odd. It used to be [if] you get a 1,600 you'd be in the newspaper. Now it's like people are getting the perfect scores all around.

Good: I did pretty good. I actually went to home school because I was working on a children's show on Nickelodeon. I did pretty decent, though. We'll leave it at that.

More fun facts about Meagan Good

Her older sister is actress/singler LaMyia Goode from the R&B/Hip Hop group Isyss, which is signed to Arista Records.
Her younger cousin is actor/singer Dijon Talton.
Meagan appears in the 50 cent video "21 questions" as 50's love interest
Meagan is sister with singer fom R&B group "Isyss" names La'Myia Good
Music Video Appearance: Memphis Bleek - Do My.
Appears in Imajin's music video "No Doubt."
Music Video Appearance: Lil Johnny - I Got You.
Appears in Memphis Bleek's video "Do My..."
Music Video Appearance: Imajin - No Doubt.
Appears in Lil' Johnny's video "I Got You."
Appears in Will Smith's video "Black suits coming"
Appears in 3rd Storee's music video "Get Wit Me."
Appears in Isyss music video "Single for the rest of my life."
Appears in K-Ci and JoJo's music video "This Very Moment."
Appears in Redman's music video "Ride."
Meagan stars as Junior's girlfriend Vanessa on tv show 'My wife and kids'.
Meagan was playing Jr. girlfriend, Vanessa, on the hit comedy show, My Wife and Kids, but was later replaced by Brooklyn Sudano.
Meagan used to be a dancer, studying coordinated moves.
Favorite Music artists: Aaliyah, Isyss, No Doubt, Gods Smack, Linkin Park, White Snail, and Worn. She enjoys a lot of older rock music.

Meagan Good: Eve's Bayou

The bayous of Louisiana are a strange and wonderful place -- a world unto their own, overflowing with a wealth of story and thematic possibilities. Whether it's the heated mystery of The Big Easy, the nonstop action of Hard Target, or the gory scares of Candyman, the cajun state has attracted projects in search of a setting like no other in North America. It is here, amidst the darkly beautiful swamps, that first-time director Kasi Lemmons has set Eve's Bayou, a fascinating tale of guilt, consequences, and voodoo.

One of the most important rules of writing -- whether it's screenwriting, article writing, or book writing -- is to start with a compelling first line. Eve's Bayou takes that lesson to heart, opening with this refrain: "Memory is a selection of images. Some elusive, others printed indelibly on the brain. The summer I killed my father, I was ten years old…" The moment the narrator speaks these words, our curiosity is piqued, and, for the next 100 minutes, our attention is engaged as we ponder their significance. The next time they are uttered, in the film's closing frames, they have acquired new meaning.

Beginning with this preamble, Eve's Bayou takes us to the Tennessee Williams country of the deep south and introduces us to the rarest of motion picture institutions: an affluent black family. (Judging by the movies, most blacks live in inner city ghettos.) Ultimately, however, this film is not about skin color, but about the deeply-rooted bonds that join women together, which not even the most tragic of mistakes can obliterate. The setting -- a small town in Louisiana during the 1950s -- serves its purpose, but the themes broached by the writer/director are anything but parochial in nature.

The focus of the film is on the five-member Batiste family. There's Louis (Samuel L. Jackson), a prominent and respected doctor; Roz (Lynn Whitfield), the beautiful, elegant mother of a son and two daughters; and their children -- 14-year old Cisely (Meagan Good), 10-year old Eve (Jurnee Smollett), and 9-year old Poe (Jake Smollett). Members of the extended family, particularly Louis' mother (Ethel Ayler) and sister, Mozelle (Debbi Morgan), are never far away. On the surface, Louis is the perfect husband and father, but he doesn't pay much attention to his marriage vows. His wife, who knows of his indiscretions, conveniently looks the other way, but, when his daughter Eve catches him in the act, the issue becomes a festering sore in the family's stability. The situation is further exacerbated when Cisely's near-worshipful affection for her father threatens to cross a forbidden barrier and when a voodoo priestess (Diahann Carroll) predicts disaster. "Look to your children," she cryptically intones to a frantic Roz.

Eve's Bayou deals frankly with the consequences of actions -- there's no moralizing or condescending to the audience. Louis pays both an emotional and a tangible price for his many affairs. Cisely's clouding of the truth has its own unfortunate result. And an ill-considered yet passionate decision on Eve's part has devastating ramifications. The film also makes a point of showing that everything is not as it seems, especially in the tangled web of family relationships. Lemmons applies the technique of the unreliable narrator to several sequences to illustrate how a slight change in perception can alter the impact of a scene. On two occasions, she presents events from varying viewpoints to demonstrate that minor differences can lead to a vastly different interpretation.

The strongest element of Eve's Bayou is the character interaction. Every member of the family (except young Poe) is developed into a unique individual, and all of the relationships are well-defined. The changes that occur are perfectly reasonable. What family doesn't go through an upheaval when secrets come into the open? The low-key plot, with its elements of voodoo and spiritual sight, allows us to the opportunity to get to know the Batistes. Lemmons' fine writing is complimented by a series of strong performances. Samuel L. Jackson, whose involvement was critical to getting Eve's Bayou made, is as solid as ever in a role that requires a less- flamboyant portrayal than we have become accustomed to. Lynn Whitfield radiates cool beauty while Debbi Morgan emanates sensual heat. Jurnee Smollett and Meagan Good, the young actors playing Eve and Cisely, are both believable as sisters with close ties and hidden jealousies. Smollett captures the essence of a 10-year old without ever seeming too cute or precocious.

If there's a weakness in Eve's Bayou, it's that the setting isn't used as effectively as it could be. Placing the film in and around the swamps of Louisiana affords a rich opportunity for atmosphere that isn't utilized. Several throwaway shots of reeds and water establish the location, but do little to imbue the bayou with a life of its own. Also, Lemmons' occasional use of collages of black-and-white images seems a little too artsy. Thankfully, the voiceover is confined to the beginning and end, and the writer/director obeys one of the most important tenants of film making: show, don't tell.

A subtle picture that treads a delicate line between drama and psychological thriller, Eve's Bayou is refreshing in that doesn't attempt to replicate Hollywood's ideal "black" film (either a bawdy sex comedy or an urban drama). Rather than perpetuating racial stereotypes, Eve's Bayou defies them, creating several well-rounded characters and placing them in a deceptively complex story that builds to a forceful conclusion. It's a movie like no other on the market today, and deserves to find its audience.

Meagan Good looks for a new opportunity

MEAGAN GOOD Ever seen an actress who's tired of being typecast as the pretty girl? Meet 21 -year-old Meagan Good. Although she has a long line of diverse credits--1997's neoclassic Eve's Bayou, and Nickelodeon's Cousin Skeeter, as well as gigs on Touched by an Angel and Moesha--Good says she is often overlooked for roles that would allow her some versatility. "My goal is to do something that's not about race or a certain look," says the Los Angeles native.

Good's next few movies, Deliver Us From Eva and Biker Boyz (both coming in February) and Ride or Die (next spring) may finally let her show her skills. In Biker, a story about Black motorcyclists starring Laurence Fishburne, she plays Tina, a leather-mini-wearing tattoo artist--a part that was originally written for a White actress. "Tina is independent and in control, and that's not a role that Black women often get to play," says Good. "I just had to take advantage of this opportunity." Now she's ready to rev it up.

Meagan Good: The Cookout

When inner-city comedies get as contrived and generic as this by-the-numbers programmer concerning two very different 'hoods, the urban-flick genre is in big trouble. The alleged laughter begins when Rutgers University basketball star Todd Anderson (singer Storm P) becomes a No. 1 draft pick for pro hoops, which translates to an immediate change in lifestyle: needless perks and presents for his hard-working mom and dad (Jenifer Lewis and Frankie Faison) in Newark, N.J.; lavish jewelry for his brand-new girlfriend Brittany (Meagan Good), although mom correctly pegs her as a golddigger glomming onto the gravy train; and a pricey mansion in a gated community, where dad chimes in, "Why do you need 10 bathrooms? You only got one ass!"
Todd even wants his new digs to become the location for the Andersons' annual backyard barbecue. Difficulties loom, alas, when wanna-be gangsta Bling Bling (Ja Rule) hatches an eBay scam involving Todd's sneakers; a pair of mixed-marriage neighbors, including a retired judge (Danny Glover) and his trophy wife (Farrah Fawcett), are appalled by the cookout's old-school goings-on; and a gung-ho rent-a-cop (Queen Latifah, who also served as an executive producer) threatens to maintain the peace by any means necessary. Good thing Todd's childhood gal pal Becky, once a gangly lass in braces, makes a belated appearance at the party--and of course she's all grown up as a bona fide hottie, as played by the curvy Eve. Neverthless, mom still affirms amid the chitlins and sodium-laced hams that the "three Fs" will be enforced: "fun, food and family." (Hmmmm, I've got a fourth F to add to that Cookout list...to accompany my upraised middle finger.)
The script rides on a sound premise regarding how jocks must cope with instant fame and millions, so maybe it's no accident that Storm P has a braided 'do similar to Carmelo Anthony, while Meagan Good looks like a kissin' cousin of Robin Givens. Too bad director Lance Rivera is on autopilot for this D.O.A. comedy, which is low on the genuine good vibrations of the Barbershop flicks, while the laughs are even harder to come by, especially when The Sopranos' Vincent Pastore turns up as a "manure broker." Within this truly triflin' affair, Jenifer Lewis lends some vigorous veteran sass, Tim Meadows grabs some scattered yuks as an uncle with conspiracy theories involving "The Man" and Jonathan Silverman makes the most of his flustered sports agent, although The Cookout's most substantial laugh concerns what's sitting atop the noggin of sportscaster Marv Albert, who apparently gained custody of Howard Cosell's old toupees.

Meagan Good: All-girl, all-action

D.E.B.S. IS AN ALL-GIRL CRIME-FIGHTING SPOOF WITH A LESBIAN TWIST.
Angela Robinson is living every budding filmmaker’s dream. A couple of years ago she received a small grant from a women’s film collective to make a short all-girl crime-fighting team spoof with a lesbian twist, which led to a $5m contract with Sony to turn the short into a feature. That feature, D.E.B.S., inspired Walt Disney studios to contract Robinson to direct the $50m Herbie: Fully Loaded, a Lindsay Lohan and Matt Dillon feature due for Australian release in July.

If it sounds like a fairytale, take a moment to consider the quality of D.E.B.S. It’s slick, it has quality actors doing quality acting and it is genuinely funny. Robinson even manages to buy some stunts and good sets with her meagre (for Hollywood) budget.

It’s also the perfect film for queer Charlie’s Angels fans because, as Robinson says, it brings the lesbian subtext so often seen in girls-go-wild movies onto centre stage.

“I totally do that,” she says. “It brings it to the forefront.”

“I really love girl-power action movies but I always wanted the girls to get together with each other as opposed to with the guys. I decided to write my own because I didn’t see it happening in already existing films.”

D.E.B.S. (the letters stand for Discipline Energy Beauty Strength) tells the story of four high school girls who are chosen through a special section of the SAT exam to attend an elite crime-fighting academy.

The four checked skirt-wearing crime-fighting machines are Amy (Sara Foster), Max (Meagan Good), Dominique (Devon Aoki) and Janet (Jill Ritchie). All four have special skills and weaknesses. Amy is perfect but not sure about whether she wants to be an agent, Max is feisty but jealous, Dominique is a beautiful chain-smoking promiscuous French girl and Janet is sweet but dumb.

Their nemesis is young lesbian crime-lord Lucy Diamond (Jordana Brewster of The Fast And The Furious fame). The four D.E.B.S. are assigned to Diamond’s case but things go awry when Amy falls in love with her hot, evil enemy.

Robinson’s 2003 short film version of D.E.B.S. was funded by Power Up, a non-profit organisation made up of gay and straight women who offer financial support for other women in entertainment.

Sony backed the feature on the strength of the short film and feature script, and Robinson was able to assemble a great cast of up-and-coming actors – for example Devon Aoki, the former catwalk model who appeared in 2 Fast 2 Furious – and seasoned professionals like Holland Taylor, who plays the D.E.B.S. Academy headmistress.

“We had a barrage of great people who wanted to be on the project,” Robinson said.

“It was cool because a lot of actresses really responded to the material and thought the parts were lots of fun.”

The film has screened at Sundance Film Festival and the Berlinale in Berlin. It is also scheduled for cinema release in the US in March, which Robinson – who is currently in post-production of Herbie: Fully Loaded – is very excited about.

“I’m really psyched about it. It was a big labour of love and I’m really happy with how it turned out. I can’t wait for it to hit theatres and for big audiences to see it.”

D.E.B.S. screens as part of the Mardi Gras Film Festival on Saturday 26 February from 7:30pm at the Palace Academy Twin Cinema, Oxford St, Paddington. The Festival runs until Thursday 3 March.

 


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